Posts Tagged: parenting

Reinventing Motherhood and Re-Dreaming Reality: Talking with Ariel Gore

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Ariel Gore discusses her new novel We Were Witches, why capitalism and the banking system are the real enemies, and finding the limits between memoir and fiction. ...more

I Will Not Die for You

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Each bug in the water is one less bug on my fruit, I tell myself, ignoring the truth: under the soil, another is born. ...more

The Butt Song

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Last night as my husband got ready to go out [my daughter] grabbed his coat and said, “Call 1-900-Mix-A-Lot and kick those nasty thoughts.” ...more

Love Thy Neighbor: Talking with Yewande Omotoso

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Writer, poet, and architect Yewande Omotoso discusses her second novel, The Woman Next Door, Cape Town’s haunting beauty, and mythologies about motherhood. ...more

Finding the Finally: Alice Anderson Discusses Some Bright Morning, I’ll Fly Away

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Alice Anderson on her memoir, Some Bright Morning, I’ll Fly Away, drag, and motherhood. ...more

Death, Memory, and Other Superpowers

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There was no cedar chest filled with tissue-wrapped rattles, handprint art projects, and bronzed baby shoes. Our parents never spoke of our missing sister. ...more

Voices on Addiction: The Honeybee

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She never stopped, a bee buzzing from flower to flower to flower, collecting all the sweetness she could. ...more

As Long as What Is Said Is Understood: Talking with Lesley Nneka Arimah

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Lesley Nneka Arimah discusses her debut collection What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky, mother-daughter relationships, and the pleasures of genre fiction. ...more

The Gate of Permission: A Conversation with Victoria Redel

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Victoria Redel discusses her newest novel, Before Everything, living through and beyond grief, and why she loves secrets. ...more

The Aura of Baby Einstein, the Child, the Toy

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If there is no distinction between show and commercial, ethics and entertainment, what kind of distinctions, if any, exists between her imaginary play, her consumer life, and our reality? ...more

The Election and the Ash Borer

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Does it matter what words a sign says when a symbol says so much more? A white X. A carved swastika. Things get torn down from less. ...more

Conversations with Writers Braver Than Me: Jessica Berger Gross

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Jessica Berger Gross discusses her new memoir, Estranged: Leaving Family and Finding Home, walking away from her parents age of twenty-eight, and the importance of boundaries. ...more

Ten Minutes of Motherhood: A Conversation with Ariel Levy

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Ariel Levy on The Rules Do Not Apply, the illusion of control, and language’s inability to express grief. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Samantha Irby

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Samantha Irby discusses her new essay collection, We Are Never Meeting in Real Life, all that comes along with writing about your life, and reading great horror books. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Lisa Factora-Borchers

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Lisa Factora-Borchers talks about being a Catholic feminist, writing across genres, and pushing back against a singular narrative about New York. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Day of the Dead

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Octavio is tired, tired of trying to separate what he remembers so vividly from the memories he can barely make out in the fog. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Raising A Feminist Son

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I think about the birth of Mosley, and all of the dreams I already have for him at the ripe age of one. I know how I want him to see me—strong, smart, capable of anything and everything. This is how I want him to see all women, but me especially. ...more

The Day the FBI Tapped Our Phones

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I held an image in my mind of my daughter and me in a small rowboat and I’m rowing, rowing, rowing as hard as I can, away from this sinking ship. ...more

Storytelling Is a Search: An Interview with Sequoia Nagamatsu

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Sequoia Nagamatsu discusses his debut collection Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone, grief as a character, and the intersection of ancient myth and the modern world. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Savage Mind, Pt. 1

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The violence came in and we were not just in danger of being victims of it. We were in danger of being violent ourselves. ...more

The Evolution of a Trigger

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Perhaps they are really saying: This will not happen to me. I will be prepared. And, in hoisting that hypothetical gun, they feel they are made safe from the appalling vulnerability of living. ...more