Posts Tagged: pop culture

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The Rumpus Interview with Paula Whyman

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Paula Whyman discusses her debut collection You May See a Stranger, discovering truth in fiction, and how memory interferes with good storytelling. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Andi Zeisler

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Andi Zeisler, co-founder of Bitch and author of the new book We Were Feminists Once: From Riot Grrl to CoverGirl, discusses capitalism, breast implants, pop culture, and feminism. ...more

Sorry, Who?

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Pop culture has been a steadfast element of public life for a while, but it feels like lately there’s even more pressure to keep up with a certain caché of writers, movies, TV shows, artists, and events. At The Hairpin, Rosa Lyster turns this impulse on its head and gives us an out with the Žižek game:

This is the beating heart of the Žižek Game: the disbelief that something you care about has failed to register on the consciousness of another.

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Why We Love Witches

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At The Establishment, Annie Theriault discusses the allure of witches and witchcraft for girls that has lingered since the 17th century, musing on how witches both subvert and uphold gender roles:

Beneath all that glossy packaging hums the same idea that has tantalized girls for millennia: the fact that to be a witch is to be a woman with power in a world where women are often otherwise powerless.

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Podcatcher #2: Rose Buddies

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Rachel and Griffin McElroy, hosts of The Bachelor fancast Rose Buddies, talk about about the problematic aspects of the show, how they stay hydrated, and what’s up with all those McElroy podcasts. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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Some people write about dystopian futures, or reimagined folktales, or ghosts, or science fiction. Sequoia Nagamatsu, author of the upcoming story collection Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone, does it all. The debut collection, out this month from Black Lawrence Press, weaves Japanese folklore and pop culture into fantastical plots and futuristic settings to create stories that illuminate the human heart in modern times.

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12 Lol-Worthy Gifs That Will Recuperate Feminist Praxis

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Bitch is where many of today’s feminist internet denizens (yours truly included) got our start reading and writing about culture with a critical eye. In many ways, Zeisler’s book is a call to arms, asking us to return to a rigorous, systemic analysis.

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The Rumpus Interview with Laurie Foos

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Laurie Foos discusses her latest novel, The Blue Girl, feminism, Michael Jackson, and mythical moon pies. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Lincoln Michel

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Lincoln Michel talks about his debut short story collection, Upright Beasts, his interest in monsters, and what sources of culture outside of literature inspire him. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Thunder, Thighs

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Over one third of the women in my survey had been called “Thunder Thighs” at some point in their life. Many were still haunted by this. None of them interpreted “thunder” to mean “power. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Jacob Wren

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Jacob Wren discusses his newest novel, Polyamorous Love Song, the relationship between art and ethics, and whether Kanye West is a force for good in the art and music world. ...more

Banish the Bae

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No one holds a monopoly on cranky admonishments of popular parlance, but Lake Superior State University’s annual “List of Banished Words” does hold the distinction of admonishing longest. The 40th year’s list is now out, featuring words in the “get off my lawn” tradition (kids today, debasing the language with their “swag” and “baes,”), words suffering from topical overuse (LSSU is over the “Polar Vortex” and calling every innovation a “hack”), and words that are simply objectionable on principal (“enhanced interrogation techniques” and “Friend-raising”).

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Three Ways of Looking at Sex and the City

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In this week’s New Yorker, TV critic Emily Nussbaum grapples with the cultural legacy of Sex and the City:

High-feminine instead of fetishistically masculine, glittery rather than gritty, and daring in its conception of character, “Sex and the City” was a brilliant and, in certain ways, radical show.

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Religion vs. Pop Culture

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“There was a time, religious historians say, that religion was easy to pinpoint because people were defined by their beliefs, practices and traditions of worship. Now, with the sheer number of people and faiths intermingling, believers are consumers of religion.”

Kathryn Lofton, who most recently authored Oprah: The Gospel of an Icon, is master of the overlapping themes in religion and pop culture.

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