Posts Tagged: Ta-Nehisi Coates

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The Rumpus Interview with Yaa Gyasi

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Yaa Gyasi discusses her debut novel Homegoing, growing up in Alabama, the multiplicity of black experiences, the legacy of slavery, and her writing process. ...more

Homeward Unbound

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Some would argue that the loss of privacy is a small price to pay to have your voice heard on an international scale. But over at the Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates writes honestly and unpretentiously about his difficulties returning home as a prominent literary figure, and how his sudden visibility carries a safety concern particular to being a black man who regularly speaks his truth:

But the world is real.

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Broadway-Blues-Bad Casting

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Ever since Zoe Saldana was set to play Nina Simone in the upcoming biopic Nina, controversy has surrounded the casting choice. Writing in the Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates says that the issue isn’t just about Saldana’s lighter skin tone, but the erasure of Simone’s facial features and what it says about America’s racist beauty standards:

Saldana has said that others actors who better resembled Simone passed on the role, and that she herself declined it for a year.

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Angela Flournoy

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Angela Flournoy

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My ambition is personal. I don’t think I need to succeed so that the race can succeed. ...more

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Guildtalk #4: The Rumpus Interview with Saeed Jones

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Saeed Jones talks about his forthcoming memoir How Men Fight For Their Lives, his new fellowship program at BuzzFeed, and making peace with the phantom. ...more

Black Memoir

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Memoir, the offspring of the slave narrative, is not simply a form within the Black literary tradition; it has thoroughly shaped that tradition.

With the release of smash hit Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates, as well as acclaimed releases Negroland, Twin of Blackness, and Remnants, the black memoir is in a veritable golden age. 

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Reading Mixtape feature

Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #16: For My Friend Craig, on a Boozy Midnight

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You know how you can like a book just fine, but if you love a book, you’ll tell a friend about it? I told my friend Craig about all of these books. Craig has a facile brain and big heart and a sometimes crusty manner—which makes me like him extra.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Shane McCrae

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Shane McCrae about his new book The Animal Too Big to Kill, listening to music while writing, addressing God in poetry, and The Oak Ridge Boys. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Elisabeth Egan

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Elisabeth Egan discusses her debut novel, A Window Opens, life as a book lover, workplace jargon, and the question we should ask ourselves in place of can we “have it all”. ...more

Ta-Nehisi Coates, Comic Book Nerd

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Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” Between the World and Me, and, most recently, “The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration,” will continue highlighting the societal problems faced by young African-American men in his new work this spring—through the perspective of Marvel superhero Black Panther.

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Imperiled Across Both the Deep and Immediate Past

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At the Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates unflinchingly analyzes and condemns the history of mass incarceration in America and its disproportionately devastating effect on black families:

The blacks incarcerated in this country are not like the majority of Americans. They do not merely hail from poor communities—they hail from communities that have been imperiled across both the deep and immediate past, and continue to be imperiled today.

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Reading Mixtape feature

Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #1: For White Folks Who Think They Aren’t Racist

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What You See

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Ta-Nehisi Coates’s new book Between the World and Me is a letter addressed to his son that America needs to read. New York profiles the author, whose fearless writing about race continues to hold readers accountable to history:

Coates’s writing takes an almost opposite position: that religion is blindness, and that if you strip away the talk of hope and dreams and faith and progress, what you see are enduring structures of white supremacy and no great reason to conclude that the future will be better than the past.

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Baltimore: A Rumpus Roundup

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On April 12th, four Baltimore bicycle police arrested 25-year-old Freddie Gray.

Gray sustained injuries while in police custody. He asked for medical assistance repeatedly before slipping into a coma. A week later, he died.

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The Case for Reparations

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The latest issue of The Atlantic Monthly  just went live, and the feature story by Ta-Nehisi Coates is a monster. It’s about making the moral case for reparations, but it expands the conversation surrounding this topic in two ways. The first way it does this is by pointing out, in vivid detail, the way that the exploitation and mistreatment of blacks in the US is an inextricable part of our history and that it continues to this present day.

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Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Brilliant Take on the Zimmerman Verdict

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Not to overload anyone on political coverage, but Ta-Nehisi Coates’s reaction to the George Zimmerman trial is an absolute must-read.

In it, he looks at the actual legal text involved in the case and points out that what’s so deeply frightening about it isn’t that the verdict flouted the law; it’s that the law—and in many ways, the entire concept of American justice—is written to enable this kind of verdict.

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A Very Non-Accidental Response to Brad Paisley

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You may have noticed one or two jokes about Brad Paisley and LL Cool J’s collaboration “Accidental Racist,” partially because of every aspect of the song, but mainly because of every aspect of the song.

But Ta-Nehisi Coates puts humor aside for his response in the Atlantic, choosing instead to “seriously and directly engag[e] Brad Paisley and his stated motives for the song.” And he does it really well:

“Booming System” is dope.

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Why the Civil War Is Still Worth Talking About

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Byliner’s list of spectacular nonfiction articles of 2012 highlights two complementary essays from the Atlantic‘s Civil War issue.

First, Yoni Appelbaum uses a hyperrealistic “cyclotron” painting of the Battle of Gettysburg as a pin to puncture the national narrative that the Union and the Confederacy were equally noble, and that veterans from both sides had only to recognize their mutual heroism to become “comrades.”

Ta-Nehisi Coates takes on the same battle and the same narrative (as well as the same Faulkner passage) from a different perspective.

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