Posts Tagged: television

Old Friends

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Upbeat YA protagonists are a far cry from the tortured figures we’re used to watching on television. Flavorwire’s Sarah Seltzer makes her predictions for Nancy Drew and Anne of Green Gables’s forthcoming return to the small screen:

Two iconic characters with sunny auras and relatively straightforward histories are about to be reimagined in the context of today’s dark, morally ambiguous antiheroes.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Making a Murderer and “Bad” Families

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There were “good” families and “bad” families, and even I, an outsider, was quickly apprised of which was which. ...more

No Hope

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Rumpus Interviews Editor Ben Pfeiffer discusses the complete loss of hope in Anton Chekhov’s literary works, in relation to modern TV shows such as The Leftovers and The Walking Dead. Pfeiffer wonders why people have continued to, watch, read, and create these dark, despairing works when we already live in a world of tragedy:

…a dispassionate search for truth isn’t just one kind of artists’ quest — it’s also a habit one must cultivate.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Taking Comfort in Futurama

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I’m a comfort watcher... I retreat into the worlds I know well, with characters that are friends, with outcomes I already understand. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Lincoln Michel

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Lincoln Michel talks about his debut short story collection, Upright Beasts, his interest in monsters, and what sources of culture outside of literature inspire him. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: On Madness and Mad Men

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In my eight years as a Mad Men fan, the series has repeatedly prompted me to reflect on parenting. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Bill Cosby’s Faux Legacy

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Bill Cosby was never the man, the icon, the protector and illustrator of black culture, the guide, the genius we have created in our minds. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Crushed

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He’s a cute mensch, I gathered, a cuddly fellow with a well- groomed beard, sad eyes, and, most importantly, a comforting voice that sounded like he was about to either cry or laugh. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Jacob Wren

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Jacob Wren discusses his newest novel, Polyamorous Love Song, the relationship between art and ethics, and whether Kanye West is a force for good in the art and music world. ...more

Tip of the Hat to Colbert

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Among the many tributes to the nine-year run of The Colbert Report, which aired its final episode last week, comes Vulture’s tip of the hat on behalf of “book nerds.” The Colbert Report interviewed two authors a week, on average, introducing their work to what was arguably the publishing industry’s best audience; Boris Kachka reports that, aside from Oprah’s Book Club, no other celebrity endorsement delivered such a reliable bump in sales.

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The Rumpus Interview with Frederick Barthelme

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Frederick Barthelme talks about his new novel, There Must Be Some Mistake, life after teaching, and why food from the Olive Garden is “execrable in the best possible way.” ...more

YA Television

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This summer’s debate over young adult literature has raised questions ranging from whether adults should read YA to what even counts as thee genre in the first place. The New Yorker’s television critic Emily Nussbaum extends these questions to the world of television, where adolescent dramas have had a different impact on the development and survival of the medium:

This debate has focused on books.

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When Life and Art Get Messy

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A writer for Orange is the New Black talks about discovering she was gay while writing for the show:

Accordingly, I was nervous about the first love scene I’d written for Alex and Piper. I’d loved writing it, loved watching a tenderness emerge in their relationship where passion always seemed to be the ruling principle, but by that time, I was so deep in my own self-doubt that I constantly felt like a fraud.

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David Foster Wallace Was A Comedy Nerd

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Blythe Robertson unpacks David Foster Wallace’s thoughts, and impacts, on American comedy for Splitsider.

Wallace often worried about the overwhelming amount of irony on television – talking heads poking fun at those watching the show while viewers laugh along at themselves, neither party doing much to fix their apparent boredom with the shallowness of the medium.

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Hollywood, Writer: The Rumpus Interview with Brian McGreevy

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Brian McGreevy has had the kind of dizzying career assent you usually only see, well, in the movies. At 28, he’s already been a working screenwriter for years and had two scripts* on Hollywood’s coveted Black List. This month his first novel, Hemlock Grove, was published by FSG and it’s already on it’s way to becoming an original series for Netflix

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TV’s Backwards Progress

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One would hope that there has been steady progress in terms of the presence of women writers in television, but a recent San Diego State study suggests quite the opposite.

Their Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film quantifies the gender breakdown annually.

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