Posts Tagged: television

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Samantha Irby

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Samantha Irby discusses her new essay collection, We Are Never Meeting in Real Life, all that comes along with writing about your life, and reading great horror books. ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #32: Make the Soup

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I am meditating. In a room in Rodeo, at the rickety old secretary/dresser I use as a desk. It is by a window. I look out at the roadway, and think I am glad to live at a crossroad. The house across the street is silver grey.

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How The Keepers Reframes Confession as a Feminist Act

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Critics have noted how The Keepers is similar to other prestige documentaries but with a significant difference—its focus on the victims and their stories. ...more

Just Chaste Me

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The more first-time stories I heard, the longer I was willing to wait. ...more

Digging for Characters: A Conversation with Sonya Chung

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Sonya Chung discusses her latest novel The Loved Ones, the mental space required to wander around fictional worlds, and looking back at her childhood. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Julie Buntin

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Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, the writers and books that influenced it, tackling addiction with compassion, and the magic of teenage girls. ...more

A Certain Frequency: Radio’s Appeal Across 75 Years

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Today, radio is bigger than ever—but in vastly different forms. More people listen to the radio than watch TV, according to Nielsen, only now it’s on a computer, a tablet, or a smartphone. ...more

Learning to Live Alone through the Legacy of Mary Tyler Moore

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Characters like Mary and Rhoda hadn't been turned into stereotypes of single women in their thirties or career women or divorcees. They couldn't be: they were the first. ...more

Good Girls Revolt and Female-Focused Sex on TV

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Sexual politics run through the very veins of this show. They are its blood, and they know how to get the female viewer’s heart pumping. ...more

Luke Cage: When Representation Isn’t Enough

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This show’s true strength is its diverse portrayal of African-American subjectivity and morality, amongst both the male and female characters. ...more

An Ultimate Illustrated Fantasy Guide of Gilmore Girls Mashups

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HOW AWESOME WOULD THESE MASHUPS BE? Oh well. Maybe next year. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #64: Lianne Stokes

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Hi there! We’re the two brunettes who hate sex. Sara-Kate hates sex because it’s too aerobic—she once sprained her foot. She lives in Kips Bay, loves candy, and wears exclusively rompers. Elisa Jordana hates sex because she abhors the human penis and all its functions.

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Mr. Clarke, the Real Hero of Stranger Things

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He’s the teacher who encourages questions beyond the class assessment, who always gets his students to open the “Curiosity Door.” ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #9: Punk the Deadline!

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Oh my god, I’m stuck again. A truck in the muck. A cat up a tree. An explorer in quicksand. Winnie the Pooh in the door of Rabbit’s house. Trying to birth a column and needing a Caesarean. Is there any horror worse for a writer than a deadline?

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Natural Born Drivers

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He only knew that the Blazer, like the green card, was something he wanted my brother and me to have, so that we knew we deserved things, things like America. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation

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Parker set out to bring a different kind of “slavery movie” to audiences. And it is different. ...more

America Again

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I felt urgently that it was the moment to tell the story of what I’ve learned about American music—or maybe about being an American. ...more

Meaty on TV

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Cable television channel FX has purchased Meaty, a comedy series based on Samantha Irby’s memoir of the same title. Developed by Irby, Jessi Klein (head writer for Inside Amy Schumer, author of You’ll Get Over It), and Abbi Jacobson (Broad City, author of forthcoming Carry this Book), the show will focus on “failed relationships, taco feasts, her struggles with Crohn’s disease, poverty, blackness, and body image.”

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The Rumpus Interview with Paula Whyman

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Paula Whyman discusses her debut collection You May See a Stranger, discovering truth in fiction, and how memory interferes with good storytelling. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Annie DeWitt

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Annie DeWitt discusses her debut novel, White Nights in Split Town City, the 90s, and the brutality of nature. ...more

The Stranger Things Mixtape

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If you haven’t been watching Stranger Things, you’re probably being chased by a monster in “the upside down.” The show’s soundtrack is a mashup of synth-laden soundscape themes and ’80s throwbacks that’ll have Gen Xers’ hearts yearning for that simpler, cellphone-free era.

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UnREAL Gaze

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Ultimately what is more real and desirable is showing savage, ambitious women rising from the ashes of a sexist society and becoming whole, instead of acting like dudes.

For Tabú, Antonia Crane writes about UnREAL, a Lifetime drama highlighting destructive, demeaning, and terrible working conditions for women, and how it subverts the male gaze by actively engaging in a kind of radicalism.

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Serial Fiction While You Wait for Next Week’s Episode

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NPR talks with the creators of Serial Box, a company self-described as the “HBO for readers.” Serial Box releases “episodes” you read over a 10-16 week season, in the hopes that readers will anticipate the next installment like they would the next episode of The Bachelorette, or binge-read a series after purchasing the complete box set.

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Winning the Game of Thrones Like a Girl

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The days of testosterone-fueled warmongering are long past. Instead, at the end of Season 6, the queens reign, stronger than ever. ...more

The Desire for Distraction

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For The Millions, Mike Broida revisits David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest, arguing that the work’s claims about addiction and the media presaged the influence of “television culture” on the digital age:

The final “joke” of Infinite Jest is that the book is intended to be almost as endless and mirthful as the addictions it depicts.

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