Posts Tagged: the walrus

This Week in Essays

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Over at The Walrus, Fatima Syed looks to build space in popular culture for depictions of different types of Muslims. With a sinking feeling, Kristen Arnett looks inside herself and finds nothing but the swamp of Florida’s influence in a reflective essay for Lit Hub. Alcy Levya launches The Rumpus’s July series, #reclaimingpatriotism2017, with a powerful essay about his duties on the front lines […]

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This Week in Essays

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For Guernica, Carmen Maria Machado writes about cultural myths around large women and fighting to take up space with her body and her mind. Woe be to those who buy the Peggy couch. Anna Hezel pens a hilarious “buyer beware” at The Awl. Over at Lit Hub, Stéphane Gerson shares the process of writing his grief after losing his son.

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Writer, Storyteller, Pilot, Spy

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Though he fled the country as soon as possible, the writer would maintain an affection for Canada that lasted throughout his life. Over at The Walrus, Michael Hingston explores Roald Dahl’s time at Camp X—a World War II army base in Canada for the British Security Coordination, a covert intelligence organization. Dahl was sent there […]

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The Future of Hip-Hop

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The rap golden age of the ’90s may be over, but rappers today are achieving a kind of mainstream cultural influence that would’ve been hard to imagine twenty years ago. Over at The Walrus, Simon Lewsen writes about Canadian rapper Drake, the state of modern-day hip-hop music, and how the genre has changed over the last […]

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The Gender Novels

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Gender transition seems to fascinate just about everyone who hasn’t gone through it, so it makes sense that we get a lot of literary fiction on the subject . . . All these books were penned by cisgender—that is, non-transgender—authors. In that, they join a very twenty-first-century sub-genre: sympathetic novels about transition by people who […]

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Word of the Day: Dépaysé

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(adj.); out of one’s element; situated in unfamiliar surroundings; from the Old French despaisier (to exile) As a species, we’ve somehow survived large and small ice ages, genetic bottlenecks, plagues, world wars, and all manner of natural disasters, but I sometimes wonder if we’ll survive our own ingenuity. —Diane Ackerman, in “Nature, Pixellated” Camping, cottages, […]

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Politics Sunday

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Gangland tours of LA, with one helluva waiver. In New Orleans, what happens when sex workers are prosecuted as sex offenders. A brilliantly written profile of a sniper. “(M)y grandmother’s feet were bound in China, and there were people here in the U.S. who said, “This is horrific.” And there were people in China who said, “This […]

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Sunday Political Links

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People seemed to like the political links last week, so here are some more. Enjoy! If you are an evil person,  becoming a lawyer for a military contractor is a great career move. How Louis Armstrong fought anti-Semitism (via) A disturbing article on sexual slavery within the U.S. “It is presently less risky and more […]

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