Posts Tagged: trauma

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Justin Phillip Reed

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Justin Phillip Reed on his debut collection, Indecency, why he loves struggling with connotation, and the irresponsibility of American society.

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In the Wake of His Damage

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To be named, and yet not named. Something broke in me when I read his synopsis of us, as if I had been summarily dismissed after twenty long years.

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The Emotion of the Moment: Talking with Terese Marie Mailhot

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Terese Marie Mailhot discusses her debut memoir, Heart Berries, crafting trauma on the page, and her views on motherhood after writing her memoir.

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These Places Surround Me: Talking with Quintan Ana Wikswo

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Quintan Ana Wikswo discusses her novel, A Long Curving Scar Where the Heart Should Be, delving into the facets of trauma, and her creative processes.

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Taking Back Control: A Conversation with Joseph Osmundson

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Joseph Osmundson discusses his memoir, Inside/Out, intimacy, trauma, and the sometimes violence of desire.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Tarfia Faizullah

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Tarfia Faizullah discusses her new collection, Registers of Illuminated Villages, mystery stories, the nature of evil, and mourning pages.

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It’s All about Positionality: Talking with Kayleb Rae Candrilli

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Kayleb Rae Candrilli discusses their debut collection, What Runs Over, reclaiming memory through poetry, and the political act of being happy.

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The Final Girl

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I wanted to be scared because being terrified taught me how to survive.

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The Thread: Volcanoes

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Is there a relationship between the violence that came through me, and the violence that came at me?

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #126: Christopher Zeischegg

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“Being thrust into forced ritualistic closeness does break the ice, but doesn’t guarantee closeness.”

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What Did You Expect, Though?

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The immune system, meant to protect a body from foreign invaders, works too assiduously, sees danger where there is none, turns on itself. Such conditions lend themselves to metaphor.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #125: Tyree Daye

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“I think if you are really doing the work, you can’t write about America and not explore race and slavery, and that goes for any writer.”

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ENOUGH: While the Wild Dogs in Me Strain at Their Leashes

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A Rumpus series of work by women and non-binary people that engages with rape culture, sexual assault, and domestic violence.

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Guns or No Guns: Mental Health Crisis in Schools

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I do the best I can to reach out to those I see isolated or disturbed, but I have to also be careful I don’t make myself a target.

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A Spirit Born into a Human Body: Talking with Akwaeke Emezi

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Akwaeke Emezi discusses her debut novel, Freshwater, her public and private identities, and deciding when to translate culture for readers.

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ENOUGH: I Am Never the Same Girl Again

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A Rumpus series of work by women and non-binary people that engages with rape culture, sexual assault, and domestic violence.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Morgan Jerkins

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Morgan Jerkins discusses This Will Be My Undoing, getting her start on the Internet, and why her collection of linked personal essays isn’t just another Millennial read.

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The Narrator-Guide: A Conversation with Sharon Harrigan

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Sharon Harrigan discusses her memoir, Playing with Dynamite, writing through the gaps in memory, and how the book has changed real-life relationships.

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Setting aside Time for Magic: Talking with Myriam Gurba

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Myriam Gurba discusses her new memoir, MEAN, her writing process, and why she has hope for patriarchy’s dissolution.

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FUNNY WOMEN: Other Contenders for 2017’s Word of the Year

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Fückit: When you’ve had enough, more than enough, but somehow enough is never enough, and I put wine in my cereal now.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Katia D. Ulysse

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Katia D. Ulysse discusses her forthcoming novel, Mouths Don’t Speak, the importance of religion and music in the novel and in Haitian culture, and why Haiti will always be “home.”

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