Posts Tagged: young adult

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tania James

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Tania James discusses her most recent novel, The Tusk That Did the Damage, the challenges of writing an elephant narrator, and the moment when she knew she could be a writer. ...more

YA Novels Help Parents Talk Sex

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A discussion with your kid about the birds and the bees might be one of the more intimidating moments of parenthood, but YA novelists can lend a hand. When YA writers confront modern issues of sex, rape, consent, abuse, and gender, they help parents—and schools—introduce these sensitive topics:

Consent doesn’t even have to be about sex, per se, says Earl Sewell, who has written several young adult novels, including one where a boy pressures a girl to send explicit photos after they start sexting.

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YA Television

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This summer’s debate over young adult literature has raised questions ranging from whether adults should read YA to what even counts as thee genre in the first place. The New Yorker’s television critic Emily Nussbaum extends these questions to the world of television, where adolescent dramas have had a different impact on the development and survival of the medium:

This debate has focused on books.

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Are YA Dystopian Novels Breeding Conservatives?

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The Harry Potter series might have been helping make young kids more open and accepting of diversity, but a new crop of young adult novels might be push kids in the opposite direction of the political spectrum. Heroines like Katniss Everdeen and Tris Prior aren’t just strong women–they’re exceptionally special people oppressed by nanny states politics, claims Ewan Morrison, writing over at The Guardian, who suggests that instead of encouraging young people to question authority, these young adult dystopias are simply reinforcing technocratic libertarianism ideals:

What marks these dystopias out from previous ones is that, almost without exception, the bad guys are not the corporations but the state and those well-meaning liberal leftists who want to make the world a better place.

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All Grown Up

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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has a creepy new book cover presumably intended to attract older readers, giving another stir to the pot of YA literature that may or may not be OK for adults to read. In the New Yorker, Margaret Talbot wishes people would argue about something more interesting.

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YA Shaming

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Young adult fiction has never been more popular among grownup-adults—more than half of YA books are sold to people over the age of 18. There isn’t anything wrong with the occasional guilty pleasure, or even in indulging in topics that are, by definition, childish, says Ruth Graham, writing at Slate, but should we be concerned that we’re all losing some perspective?

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Queer Characters of Color in YA Novels

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As a queer woman of color who writes young-adult fiction, Malinda Lo “was a little bit taken aback by the sheer paucity of books I could find about queer characters of color.”

If you, too, have been seeking those sorts of books without much success, look no further: Lo has compiled a list, which, though (hopefully) not exhaustive, is a great resource for many young readers starving to see themselves represented in media of any kind.

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A Reader’s Guide to YA Novels

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Upworthy has an exhaustive (but not at all exhausting) list of young-adult books besides the Harry Potter series for the teenager in your life (or you—no judgment!).

Historical fiction (The Book ThiefIsland of the Blue Dolphins), utopian/dystopian fiction (The GiverThe House of the Scorpion), classics (Charlotte’s WebWhere the Red Fern Grows)—it’s all there.

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The Intern and the Rejectionist

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It’s your two favorite formerly anonymous publishing-industry-bloggers-turned-YA-novelists in one post!

Which is to say: Hilary T. Smith (aka The Intern) interviewed Sarah McCarry (The Rejectionist) about her new book All Our Pretty Songs. A preview:

There is also a weird cultural assumption that if a book is published as young adult it is obligated to provide some sort of moral instruction to its audience, which is deeply bizarre to me…It is not my job as a writer to instill Christian values in schoolchildren, regardless of how my book is marketed…

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Next Letter for Kids: Leslie Margolis

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Woohoo! The next Letter for Kids, going out Friday, June 14, is from Leslie Margolis!

Leslie writes books for teens and tweens, including the Annabelle Unleashed series and the brand-new Maggie Brooklyn Mysteries series. The Young Adult Library Services Association put her novel Fix on the “Popular Paperback” reading list and her novel Boys Are Dogs on the “Amazing Audiobook” reading list.

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