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Posts by: Stephanie Bento

A Novel Debut

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Over at the New York Times Book Review, Leslie Jamison and Ayana Mathis write about the excitement surrounding debut novelists’ work. “It’s like hearing an overture at the beginning of a symphony, the introduction of themes and preoccupations that will keep unfolding,” Jamison writes. Mathis says: “A debut novel is a piece of the writer’s […]

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A Romance with Concision

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Can’t wait for Sarah Manguso’s newest book, 300 Arguments? Over at Harper’s Magazine, you can read an essay excerpted from the book about brevity and aphorisms. Manguso writes: Please don’t try to convince me that my romance with concision follows from the way we experience reality now, in interrupted and interruptive increments; or that if […]

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Reading Emotions

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There’s nothing that the book world likes to debate more than the differences between literary fiction and commercial or genre fiction.   According to a new study published in Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts, readers of literary fiction are better able to understand emotions as compared with readers of popular genre fiction, Electric Literature […]

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Born of a Limitless Imagination

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Over at the Los Angeles Review of Books, Ilana Teitelbaum writes a glowing review of Helen Oyeyemi’s short story collection, What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours, praising Oyeyemi’s singular voice. Teitelbaum writes: “The dazzle of Oyeyemi’s technique fully engages the reader’s mind; the heart is undisturbed. … Oyeyemi’s infinitely nested stories seem an end […]

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Braving the Cold

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As both a storyteller and a stylist, Braverman is remarkably skilled, with a keen sense of visceral detail … that borders on sublime. Over at the New York Times, Bronwen Dickey has written a powerful review of Blair Braverman’s debut book, Welcome to the Goddamn Ice Cube, a memoir about her experience living in Norway […]

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Obviously the Work of Artists

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Director Mark Osborne describes to Vulture how he adapted Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince into an animated film: “When you’re reading the book, you’re told over and over again in the text, ‘These drawings aren’t very good,’ and you’re actually being tricked into imagining the reality Saint-Exupéry was trying to depict,” says Osborne.“There’s a charm to those […]

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Belles of the Box Office

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The multifaceted Kirsten Dunst is going to direct a new film version of Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar, and the lovely Dakota Fanning is set to star in it, the Guardian reports. “Dunst has co-written the film with Nellie Kim, while Fanning is a co-producer; shooting is scheduled to begin in early 2017,” the article […]

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Writing the Ukulele

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Over at the Los Angeles Review of Books, Steph Cha talks to Sean Carswell about his new collection of short stories, The Metaphysical Ukulele, and his writing process. Carswell recalls: Every time I thought about consciously writing a collection, it stopped being fun. After five or six years, though, I had a dozen stories. All […]

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In Conversation with Ramona Ausubel

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Desire is the center of everything. We want because we are lonely, regretful, hopeful. We want because we don’t feel at home in our bodies or our lives. Want is this pivot point between whatever happened before that we’re trying to move away from or closer to and the question of whether we’ll get there. […]

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This Year You Will Finally Read Ulysses

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You don’t like to quit, but need a nudge to wade back into the novel’s overflowing streams of character consciousness, arcane references and shifting structure to follow those people going about life in Dublin on June 16, 1904. Yes, another Bloomsday has come and gone, and maybe you didn’t get around to finishing James Joyce’s […]

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Paper Memories

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At Medium, Melissa Mesku, founding editor of New Worker Magazine, writes about what it was like to sort through thirty years’ worth of journals, diaries, notes, and scraps of paper: Those handwritten pages contained everything I was — everything I’d ever been, wanted, thought, hoped. They were just sitting there, collecting dust, taking up space. In the slow […]

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The Surprising Art of Dr. Seuss

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In addition to being a world famous children’s writer, Theodor Seuss Geisel (aka Dr. Seuss) was also a prolific artistic who produced dozens of illustrations, paintings, and sculptures. “Geisel dubbed his secret collection, containing about 200 works, the ‘Midnight Paintings,’” the Toronto Star writes. You can check out the collection at the Pendulum Gallery in Vancouver until July […]

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Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Publishing

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At Electric Literature, Lincoln Michel talks about the “taboo” topic of book sales, and offers some advice for writers: Writers should absolutely write with an eye toward art, not markets. Thinking about sales while creating art rarely produces anything good. But I’m still naïve enough to think that knowledge is always better than ignorance, and […]

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