Posts by: Walter Gordon

Don’t “Do” Rome

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At Full Stop, Stephanie Bernhard writes about why we shouldn’t “do” cities. “To suggest that a city or site can be “done,” like dishes, the laundry, or homework, reduces said city to the limits of the do-er’s consciousness or experience.”

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The Death (and Rebirth?) of the Book Review

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Why review books? At The Awl, Jane Hu takes a historical approach to answering that question. Quoting writers from Alexander Pope to Jonathan Franzen, Hu argues that the apparently ever-progressing “death” of the book review is perhaps a more nuanced process than it first appears: “Perhaps a large problem in the decline of good criticism […]

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Clarice Lispector

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“But what if there were no one around with whom to reach an agreement about the meaning of a word? What if the thing you’re trying to express can’t really be understood by anyone else?” Sarah Gerard looks at Wittgenstein, marital rights, and translation in her review of the new edition of Clarice Lispector’s The […]

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Ben Lerner in The New Yorker

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“In the name of clarity, a lot of authors offer what strike me as basically pre-fabricated structures of feeling, leaving no room for the reader to participate in the construction of meaning.” Ben Lerner, poet and author of Leaving the Atocha Station, touches on his different approaches to poetry and fiction, balancing clarity and complexity, […]

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Cattle Haul

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The latest story featured by Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading comes from National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward, author of Salvage The Bones. The story, originally published in A Public Space, is a powerful look at a long drive across the south. “Every time I go west instead of east, seem like the sun bleach all […]

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Money Novels

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In the current issue of BookForum, Christian Lorentzen, an editor at the London Review of Books, writes about “the perils of money fiction” in the twenty-first century. “There are a few ways out of these traps—ersatz journalistic gap filling, hapless gesturing at the system’s perversity, and ogling fortune with envy and scorn—of writing about bankers. […]

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Antigonick

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Anne Carson’s newest book is Antigonick, a daring, inventive translation of Sophocles’ Antigone. Like Carson’s last book, Nox (which came in the form of a poetry filled, accordian-folded scrapbook of sorts), Antigonick plays extensively with the conventions of narrative form, translation, and the physical presentation of literature: the book is hand-lettered by Carson, contains translucent vellum pages, and […]

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