Posts Tagged: A.O. Scott

Notable NYC: 2/4–2/10

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Saturday 2/4: John Domini and Carole Firstman celebrate releases from Dzanc Books. KGB Bar, 7 p.m., free. Cecilia Corrigan and Wendy Trevino join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Sunday 2/5: Chelsea Hodson, Gregory Zorko, Sarah Jean Grimm, Liz Bowen, Georgia Faust, and Amanda Dissinger read poetry. Berl’s Poetry Shop, 3 p.m., free.

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Office Space, the Final Frontier

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In A.O. Scott’s eyes, summer blockbusters and workplace sitcoms aren’t that different these days: Part of what makes work tolerable is the idea that it is heroic, the fantasy that repetitive and meaningless tasks are charged with risk and significance. Pecking away at our keyboards, we’re cowboys, warriors, superheroes. But meanwhile, superheroics look like every […]

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Eating at the Table of Another

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The critic giveth and he taketh away. In his review of Better Living Through Criticism, Jonathon Sturgeon counters A.O. Scott’s aversion to the idea of the critic as parasite: Maybe the loneliness of the American critic stems from his obsession with freeing minds, which quickly become isolated monads.

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Haters Gonna Hate

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Some movies just aren’t all that good. A.O. Scott makes the case for film snobbery: You see the problem. “Snob” is a category in which nobody would willingly, or at least unironically, claim membership. Like the related (and similarly complicated) term “hipster,” it’s what you call someone else.

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Henry James & The Great YA Debate

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Responding to the ongoing debate about whether or not American literature is saturated with young adult fiction (and if adults should read these novels), Christopher Beha, in the New Yorker, addresses A.O. Scott’s recent essay in the New York Times Magazine. While Scott dismisses Henry James and Edith Wharton as “outliers,” Beha refutes this point, […]

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Patriarchy’s Slow Unwinding

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For the New York Times Magazine, A.O. Scott argues about the “slow unwinding” of patriarchy in American culture, drawing on modern television, history, and literature. In part responding to Ruth Graham’s essay at Slate, in which she urges against adults reading young adult fiction, Scott offers a different perspective: Instead, notwithstanding a few outliers like Henry […]

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