Posts Tagged: laura miller

Notable NYC: 4/7–4/13

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Literary events and readings in and around New York City this week!

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Where Writers Rule

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At Slate, Laura Miller discusses the TV showrunner as novelist, focusing specifically on Noah Hawley. Hawley, showrunner for the FX show Fargo, has also published multiple novels, including Before the Fall: By contrast, the flawed, struggling, conflicted male characters in both seasons of Fargo register as real people, despite the darkly farcical tone the series takes […]

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The Dreamer Gazing

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Using examples like John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim Progress and Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, Laura Miller analyzes our modern concept of what an “allegory” is, in comparison to how the word has historically been used to describe literature, and how it originated: Allegorical reading requires sustaining both image and meaning in the reader’s mind, as […]

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Rooted Elsewhere

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Most of the rest of the stories in What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours are linked, with major characters in one story later turning up as minor characters in another. This loose, multiracial, polymorphously perverse, generation-spanning cast lives mostly in present-day England, but they have roots elsewhere. Anton grew up in “a country that’s not even sure […]

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No New Friends

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A connection so fundamentally optional doesn’t provide the same ambivalence and tension you get with alcoholic parents, narcissistic spouses, or resentful bosses. If your friend abuses you or your trust, you can just walk away. Slate’s Laura Miller explains why nobody writes memoirs about their friends, and then looks at two recent books that take […]

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Fan Fiction Gone Wild

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Slate’s Laura Miller details the bizarre tale of the copyright lawsuit between two No. 1 New York Times best-selling fantasy authors, showing the potential messiness of fan fiction going mainstream: If these tropes sound familiar to you, you’re not alone. After the Guardian wrote about the suit, my own social media feeds filled up with […]

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Writing on Old Age

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For Slate, Laura Miller reviews the way old age is explored and rendered through literature, especially by those of old age themselves: The essays in Alive, Alive Oh! resolve in a stubbornly untidy fashion; Athill rejects the unspoken, oppressively conventional “wisdom” that dominates the personal essay today. “My two valuable lessons are: avoid romanticism and abhor […]

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The Complexities of Litchat

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Laura Miller writes in the New Yorker about litchat and legacy: In fact, litchat has assumed an ever-greater role in criticism because so much of what once happened privately and fleetingly is now public and preserved. Social-media platforms like Facebook and Twitter are the main sites where this litchat happens today, and conversations on both […]

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Word of the Day: Miasma

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(n.); noxious exhalations from putrid organic matter; poisonous effluvia or germs polluting the atmosphere; a dangerous, foreboding, or deathlike influence or atmosphere “If the Internet is a bridge to the greater world, a troll is the beast who lives under it, extracting a toll in hurt feelings, outraged sensibilities and fear from all who pass.” […]

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If It Quacks like a Dragon

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Kazuo Ishiguro insists his new novel, The Buried Giant, is not a fantasy novel. Laura Miller at Salon agrees. Ursula K. Le Guin does not (and is a little insulted). David Barnett at The Guardian doesn’t care either way and instead sees Ishiguro’s novel as an opportunity: Why not throw open the gates, tear down […]

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Between the Lines

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While some bibliophiles hold books as sacred artworks to be carefully preserved, others can’t read without a little back-and-forth. Laura Miller makes a case for defacing pages: Marginalia is a blow struck against the idea that reading is a one-way process, that readers simply open their minds and the great, unmediated thoughts of the author […]

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True Lies

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At Salon, Laura Miller covers a recent update in the ongoing criticism of—and legal proceedings involving—Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood. Ronald Nye, the son of Harold Nye, a former agent for the Kansas Bureau of Investigation who has since died, can finally publish his father’s documents. These notes that he kept during the case present […]

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Re-Live Litquake’s digi.lit Conference

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If you couldn’t make it to Litquake’s digi.lit conference, never fear—you can listen to Laura Miller’s keynote address here. Though the conference focused on digital publishing, the Salon writer talks just as much about traditional publishing and how it has given readers what they want in a way digital publishing hasn’t quite figured out yet, despite […]

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