Posts Tagged: Sadie Stein

Just Dance

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Well, that’s the point of being alone—it’s not anything to do with you. It’s about being something in someone else’s life, and no one ever knows the difference, or the truth. That’s why people like bad movies and bad fiction, and it’s worth it, it’s worth it, it’s worth it. Over at the Paris Review, Sadie […]

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Celebrating Donuts

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At the Paris Review Daily, Sadie Stein writes a reflection on Mayflower donuts and optimism: Usually, seeing records of defunct restaurants fills me with melancholy. Each one looks so perfect, so glamorous, so wholesome, so wholly desirable. And yet Mayflower Donuts, though it’s long gone, continues to inspire, thanks to the creed. Of course, I see […]

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A Classroom of Atticus F., G., and H.

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It has been a bad summer for the iconic characters of Southern literature. Over at the Paris Review, Sadie Stein takes a look at the unfortunate facts: Atticus was kind of a racist, and Atticus is the most popular male baby name in 2015. Maybe, Stein surmises, it’s impossible to avoid baggage with any name. She […]

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Spellbound

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Unaccustomed, vicious, onomatopoeia… We all have that one word we can never spell correctly. Paris Review blogger Sadie Stein’s was “Wednesday.” “It’s like a mental block,” she writes, “or maybe, an increased reliance on technology.” Read the rest of the mini-essay here.

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Word of the Day: Nubivagant

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(adj.) wandering through or amongst the clouds; moving through air; from the Latin nubes (“cloud”) and vagant (“wandering”), c. 1656. I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o’er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and […]

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East Egg, West Egg, Deviled Egg

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Besotted by over-saturated news feeds, sometimes, you may just want to read vignettes about the more precocious members of the egg family; for this, we have Sadie Stein. Three Stories about Deviled Eggs, over at the Paris Review: Life had changed; suddenly deviled eggs were everywhere—at tapas bars, in sepia-toned Brooklyn whiskey joints. I, too, was jaded; […]

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Why Children’s Books Matter

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In a piece featured on the Paris Review’s website, Sadie Stein encourages readers to check out the New York Public Library’s exhibition “The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter.” The exhibition features original sketches and manuscripts of beloved children’s books. All these characters are complex, somewhat insolent, defiant, desperate for attention and love, and […]

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We All Contain Multitudes of Tacky

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Ever droll, Sadie Stein writes in the Paris Review about the reaction we’re (all) prone to have when people recommend literature based on our professed likes and dislikes: When someone says I will like something, I tend to assume the something in question will be precious, tedious, and often aggressively eccentric. Sometimes I do like these things, which is […]

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Notable NYC: 4/12–4/18

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Saturday 4/12: Michael Parker and Ethan Hauser celebrate their new books with a reading, musical DJ Jim McHugh, and literary mingle. Wythe Hotel, 6 p.m., free. Sunday 4/13: David Gerrard, Douglas Watson, and Jason Porter join the Sunday Night Fiction series. Gerrard’s Short Century (January 2014) centers around a mysterious blogger revealing a journalist’s incestuous […]

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F. Scott Fitzgerald Does Othello

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In honor of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s birthday a couple days ago, the Paris Review posted some audio clips of him reading passages from Keats and Shakespeare. “While he may not recite like a trained Shakespearean, his reading is clear, emotive, and confident,” writes Sadie Stein. (And hey, to give Fitzgerald his full due, not even today’s […]

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