Posts Tagged: Sunday Essay

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In the Saturday essay, “Broken Bird: Reflections on The Upside of Anger,” Kathryn Buckley notes similarities between the film, starring Keri Russell, and her own experiences—both she and Russell’s character struggled with anorexia. When Buckley finds herself in an MFA program, something clicks. She is “peaceful again” and finally able to reassure her mother that […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Julie Marie Wade reviews the “solar system” of Kimberly Burwick’s poetry collection, Good Night Brother. The son—or “sun”—in the title “burns everyone and everything it touches.” He/it “has gone the way of the supernova.” This lovable, yet hard-to-love character seduces the reader with the promise of the ineffable. Then, in the Saturday Interview, blogger […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In the Saturday Essay, Devin O’Neill considers the dual nature of the male feminist, looking back not-so-fondly on the desire to “lash out” against an unforgiving world during high school and junior high. O’Neill used “nerd” and “goth” identities to cope with the anxiety of confronting gender norms. Androgynous role models like Marilyn Manson and […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, feast your eyes upon Anne Emond’s visual ode to a lazy weekend and Grant Snider’s cartoon-in-verse, “Outside My Window.” In “Changeling,” Stephen Policoff uses serendipitous advice and the paintings of “mad artist” Richard Dadd to unlock the secret to writing about bereavement and the special role of a father as caretaker. “I’ve always been […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Diana Whitney reviews Cynthia Cruz’s poetry collection, Wunderkammer, meaning “cabinet of curiosities.” This is a book of “delicious… detail.” Cruz’s poems, Whitney declares, “have a wry sense of humor that tempers the traumas they reveal.” The poet, who was born in Germany, transports readers from Berlin to upstate New York, from death to madness […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, take a walk down memory lane with David Hajdu’s visual memoir of his favorite bar, Bradley’s, boasting art by John Carey. And in the Sunday Essay, Jordan Rosenfeld takes a frank look at the many ways a mother’s boldness can influence her daughter’s relationship with her own sexuality. Having a free spirit for a […]

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Weekend Roundup

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First, feel for Steven Kraan’s Lonely Circle. Then, in the latest The Last Book I Loved, Chris Kubica shares his affection for Krabat, by the Czech writer Otfried Preußler. The story of an adventurous boy who discovers a mysterious, magical grain mill appealed deeply to the 9-year-old Kubica. Kubica’s relationship with his former 4th grade teacher enriches a heartwarming […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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This Sunday, Ted Wilson turned five. Happy anniversary, Ted! In the latest “Last Book I Loved,” Michelle King finds a kindred spirit in Sylvia Plath, who, the first time she kissed husband Ted Hughes, allegedly bit his cheek and drew blood. King, in turn, admits to shattering wine glasses—intentionally and unintentionally—and goes on to declare that […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, “Making the Leap,” by Grant Snider. Michael Wong, in his very funny and poignant essay “Jack of Hearts,” explains how the idea of magic, as defined by his grandfather, helped him to accept the death of his father and transcend grief. In a review of Rose McLarney’s poetry collection, Its Day Being Gone, Richard […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In the latest “The Last Book I Loved,” S. Hope Mills tackles the thriller-esque 1959 novel, The Haunting of Hill House. Shirley Jackson’s talents are strong enough to spook even the avowedly un-spookable—that woman, Mills admits, “knew what it meant to be haunted.” And Heather Partington reviews Maude Casey’s novel inspired by the true story of a 19th century […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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On this warm weekend we are favored with a cool breath of fresh air from the likes of Matthew Lippman, via Michael Klein’s review of Lippman’s poetry collection, American Chew. Poems like these are refreshing in their honesty and bewitching simplicity—Lippman’s, in particular, “start outside the body,” Klein writes, “but they almost always end up […]

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