Posts Tagged: The New Statesman

No Offense, But…

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Ultimately, a writer needs to shed self-restraint and be at least slightly anti-social to succeed, and hope those they know are understanding. At the New Statesman, Oliver Farry delves into the wide variety of ways to offend people through writing, from vengefully crafting real people into unflattering characters to accidentally causing your mom to worry […]

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Notable Interns

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In The Physiology of the Employee (1841)—a pamphlet-length essay on the misery of bureaucracy—the French novelist Honoré de Balzac wrote: “An intern is to the Civil Service what a choirboy is to the Church, or what an army child is to his Regiment, or what rats and sidekicks are to Theatres: innocent, gullible, and blinded […]

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Geoff Dyer Attends Geoff Dyer Conference

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Birkbeck, University of London hosted the first international conference on the acclaimed British author Geoff Dyer. In attendance: Geoff Dyer. Aside from the rather British problem of sorting out how to refer to the author—”Dyer” would be used to refer to the work while “Geoff” would mean the man in the room—attendees argued over the […]

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From Manic Pixie Dream Girl to Stable Banshee Real Woman

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“I’m fascinated by this character and what she means to people,” writes Laurie Penny about the Manic Pixie Dream Girl archetype, “because the experience of being her—of playing her—is so wildly different than it seems to appear from the outside.” In an essay for The New Statesman, Penny explores not just the way the trope functions […]

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