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Posts Tagged: The Paris Review Daily

Why Children’s Books Matter

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In a piece featured on the Paris Review’s website, Sadie Stein encourages readers to check out the New York Public Library’s exhibition “The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter.” The exhibition features original sketches and manuscripts of beloved children’s books. All these characters are complex, somewhat insolent, defiant, desperate for attention and love, and […]

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We All Contain Multitudes of Tacky

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Ever droll, Sadie Stein writes in the Paris Review about the reaction we’re (all) prone to have when people recommend literature based on our professed likes and dislikes: When someone says I will like something, I tend to assume the something in question will be precious, tedious, and often aggressively eccentric. Sometimes I do like these things, which is […]

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Writing on Trains

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“Why do writers find the train such a fruitful work environment?” This is the question Jessica Gross sets out to answer in a recent piece published by The Paris Review, in which she describes her experience on a train to Chicago. The journey is bounded… I know when it will end… My main job is to […]

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Learning How to Write

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“The Apparent Author,” Meriç Algün Ringborg’s latest exhibition in Istanbul’s Gallery NON, presents a sound installation of an author talking about “her artistic goals, ambitions, and potentials,” as Rumpus contributor Kaya Genc writes in The Paris Review. Genc makes a startling observation about the author’s workplace: there is “a shelf holding more than one hundred […]

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A Writer’s Best Friend

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As the saying has it, a dog is a man’s best friend, but dogs are not always the pets of choice among the literary greats. Ernest Hemingway had his six-toed cats, Flannery O’Connor had her peacocks, and Vladimir Nabokov had his butterflies as Rumpus contributor Tim Taranto illustrates in his piece “Author’s Best Friend: The […]

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On Publishing and Letting Go

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“It’s even possible that there’s something retrospective in the nature of writing itself. Probably every writer’s first piece of writing, if it were possible to excavate such a thing, would be found to look backward. Writing tries to fix the past—to hold it in place and sometimes in imagination to improve it.” Author Caleb Crain […]

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Odd-Jobs of the Past

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Summer is the most appropriate time to reminisce about those “character-building” odd-jobs of yesteryear. Sometimes perusing a book’s dust-jacket, you learn that your literary idol endured some menial labor or surprising occupation and it confirms their humanity. In the spirit of this, the Paris Review Daily has got some anecdotal bits about authors and their […]

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“A Small Party for Insiders”

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Bottles of infused vodka were upturned last night at Russian Samovar for the return of the FSG Reading Series. With Lydia Davis and David Means slated to read, the bar on the second floor was papered with poets, writers and confederates of the publishing industry.

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