Posts Tagged: thomas mallon

Wish List for More

By

Alice Gregory and Thomas Mallon request sequels in the New York Times Bookends column. After sifting through some recent, popular marriage novels like Fates and Furies and Gone Girl, Gregory declares her allegiance to Evan S. Connell’s Mrs. Bridge and Mr. Bridge, which, “told in deadpan vignettes, are at once the saddest and funniest books […]

...more

A Tale of Two Siblings

By

For the New York Times’s Bookends column, Thomas Mallon and Leslie Jamison muse on the books that best capture the intricate and fraught relationships between siblings: That’s what I felt Faulkner intuited about siblings: that there were all sorts of gaps and harms and distances that might befall them, that they might inflict on each other, […]

...more

Do Facts Matter?

By

For the New York Times, Ayana Mathis and Thomas Mallon explore whether or not fiction based on historical events has a “responsibility to the truth.” While Mallon discusses how to remain within “the situational ethics” of historical fiction, Mathis differentiates between “truth” and “fact,” suggesting that fiction “is an expression of some recognizable and resonant iteration of experience.”

...more

Mario Vargas Llosa: Artist or Politician?

By

In advance of the release of Mario Vargas Llosa’s new book The Time of the Hero, Thomas Mallon investigates the relationship between the Noble Prize-winning author’s work and the political movements of his native Peru. The article focuses on Llosa’s realist style during a time when more experimental Latin American authors were obtaining international prestige, and highlights the author’s […]

...more

Highbrow, Lowbrow, Middlebrow, Nobrow

By

Critics have been locked in debate over the Internet’s effect on cultural production and reception for as long as most millennials can remember, exclamations like “democratized content” and “death of the novel” appearing at every click and turn. In this week’s New York Times “Bookends” column, two writers discuss whether dated categories are still applicable […]

...more