Reviews

So Much Love of Death: A Crown of Violets by Renée Vivien

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Translation always sacrifices something, and Pious, in her translations, has been consistent about the choice to cleave to some formal principles and lean away from others. ...more

Map-Making: Alex Dimitrov’s Together and By Ourselves

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At one point, I write in my margin: There is no X marks the spot for treasure here. The map is the treasure. Which is another way of saying: this book is the bounty; these poems are the gold. ...more

A Desi Win: Trust No Aunty by Maria Qamar

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What started off as a coping mechanism to deal with the widening generational gap within immigrant families, Qamar has shaped into a new philosophy for cultural in-betweeners. ...more

Less Brilliant but More Profound: Denis Johnson’s The Largesse of the Sea Maiden

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[I]n Johnson’s whole protean oeuvre, more than any pair of books, Jesus’ Son and The Largesse of the Sea Maiden are like binary stars, locked in orbit, distinct but inseparable, each throwing its light upon the other. ...more

The Way That Poetry Works: Holdfast by Christian Anton Gerard

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In his searing, soulful second collection, Gerard uses the language that is poetry to invite the reader in to the experience of his darkest and brightest moments. ...more

On Joy: Three Poetry Anthologies

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With impermanence and “praise for the devil” all around, it’s a gift to rediscover joy, no matter how fleeting. ...more

Disease Cloaked in Ambition: Gorilla and the Bird by Zack McDermott

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Gorilla and the Bird is an important resource for anyone impacted by the scope of bipolar disorder, as well as those who want to learn more about it. ...more

Both Outsider and Participant: Thousand Star Hotel by Bao Phi

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In Thousand Star Hotel, the bilingual writer’s struggle with expressing himself in English becomes a metaphor for the immigrant’s struggle with navigating the host nation’s hostile-yet-lucrative social terrain. ...more