Music

The Honesty of Kathleen Hanna

By

Kathleen Hanna sat down with VICE’s Kim Taylor Bennett and immediately began a very honest and powerful discussion of her experience with tokenism, how we won’t live in a post-sexist world until the rape crisis hotline stops ringing off the hook and women’s shelter rooms aren’t packed, and the incredibly difficult work of unpacking the damage perpetrated by abuse.

...more

Song of the Day: “Helpless”

By

Neil Young’s name has become synonymous with a special brand of rock music that came of age in the 60s, matured in the 70s, and burned on well past its contemporaries. From the laid back Buffalo Springfield, to the soaring harmonies of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, to his solo career, his songs and his voice have managed to stand out from some of the most noteworthy moments in music history.

...more
The Front Bottoms - The Front Bottoms | Rumpus Music

Albums of Our Lives: The Front Bottoms’ The Front Bottoms

By

When I first heard Brian Sella’s sweet, pathetic voice sing these words, they seared a sense of guilt into me. ...more

This Week in Posivibes: Hidden Ritual

By

Austin-based Hidden Ritual’s second album Always is receiving some great attention from those who respect well executed takes on sounds from music’s past. Still Single describes the band’s sound on this album by piecing together a massive collage:

They take minimal, strummy, percussive post-punk (think the Feelies ca. 

...more

Forty Years of Independent Music

By

Dazed Digital celebrated Rough Trade’s fortieth anniversary by conducting an interview with its founder, Geoff Travis, and co-director, Jeanette Lee. Responding to a question about the relevance of independent labels today, Travis cited the importance of a kind of collaborative and trustworthy editor:

David Byrne said famously that ‘everybody needs an editor.’ Talking Heads were one of the best bands ever, so if he’s saying that, it goes to prove that people like to work in an environment where there’s a dialogue with people you can trust and who artistically understand what you do and can give you honest feedback.

...more

The Copyright Saga Continues

By

A new copyright lawsuit has been initiated against Bruno Mars and Mark Ronson for their single “Uptown Funk.” Collage, a funk band out of Minneapolis, alleges that the hit rips the instrumentals of their 1983 song “Young Girls”:

Upon information and belief, many of the main instrumental attributes and themes of “Uptown Funk” are deliberately and clearly copied from “Young Girls,” including, but not limited to, the distinct funky specifically noted and timed consistent guitar riffs present throughout the compositions, virtually if not identical bass notes and sequence, rhythm, structure, crescendo of horns and synthesizers rendering the compositions almost indistinguishable if played over each other and strikingly similar if played in consecutively.

...more

The Perfect Eerie Piano Scale

By

In honor of Halloween, Consequence of Sound has collected what they deem the “10 Essential Horror Movie Scores.” Following Scorsese’s argument that music and film are intrinsically tied, “[b]ecause there’s a kind of intrinsic musicality to the way moving images work when they’re put together,” the piece celebrates how horror perhaps above all genres uses music to generate the cringing effect of its best scenes.

...more

Song of the Day: “8 (circle)”

By

It takes courage and artistic vision to take risks with music that has already won you commercial success, but lasting artists persist in doing just that. Bon Iver’s third album, 22, A Million, supports this view. The familiarly warm and affecting melodies of song writer Justin Vernon’s earlier work are reinvented here, nested in a cocoon of distortion and digital noise that holds listeners at arm’s length, rather than drawing them in close.

...more

Swinging Modern Sounds #76: American Songbag

By

In the broadest sense, I think of this work as being about the stuff of life: excitement, love, disappointment, pride, nature, cities, war, loneliness, work, class distinction, communication. ...more

This Week in Posivibes: Jerry Goldsmith’s Chinatown

By

Light in the Attic Records is reissuing Jerry Goldsmith’s 1974 soundtrack to the movie Chinatown in a limited release of 2500 copies. The reissue comes on gold vinyl, with album art by Sterling Hundley and layout by Jay Shaw. The soundtrack was an incredible feat—Goldsmith wrote the score in a mere ten days, creating a surprising, hard-to-place, and unforgettable piece that:

It wasn’t quite straight jazz, it wasn’t quite classical.

...more

Jay Z Nominated for Hall of Fame

By

Jay Z became the first rapper to be nominated to the Songwriters Hall of Fame this weekend, when he was named as a potential 2017 candidate alongside Madonna, Bryan Adams, George Michael, Gloria Estefan, Cat Stevens, Sylvester “Sly Stone” Stewart, Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds, and Max Martin, Nigel Smith reports for the Guardian.

...more

President Obama’s Block Party

By

The President and First Lady hosted BET’s Love And Happiness: A Musical Experience on the White House’s South Lawn this weekend, adding to the long list of musical moments rounding out Obama’s final term. At one point the President spotted in the audience and joked, “Dave, you have your own block party!

...more

Oasis Hijinks

By

The latest news in Oasis ridiculousness is a throwback: apparently, according to Danny Boyle, Noel Gallagher confessed he turned down the opportunity to get on the Trainspotting soundtrack because he mistakenly assumed the movie was about “train spotters.” Bummer to miss out on being a part of an iconic 90s film alongside Brian Eno, Iggy Pop, Pulp, and Primal Scream because you can’t bother to find out if it’s really just about railroad nerds, huh?

...more

Le Tigre Reunites to Say “I’m With Her”

By

Le Tigre released what they announced would be a one-song reunion: a pro-Hillary track aptly titled “I’m With Her.” Although there is some mentioning of the need to get Trump out of our political reality stat, Kathleen Hanna’s lyrics focus on Clinton’s qualifications and how “she’s always got to work twice as hard as any man.” Watch the video, directed by Laura Parnes, after the jump.

...more

America Again

By

I felt urgently that it was the moment to tell the story of what I’ve learned about American music—or maybe about being an American. ...more

This Week in Posivibes: Songs for the New Lost Generation

By

Scott & Charlene’s Wedding have released a video for “Distracted” off of their recent album Mid Thirties Singles Scene that speaks for a whole mess of people we can really understand. As Raven Sings the Blues writes, “The band’s pop hides a wealth of insight to the kind of restless energy that crops up in a generation lost to debt, dead-end jobs and armed only with guitars and some jangles to dig them out.” Watch the video after the jump and buy the record here.

...more

Awful Trump Story #983674

By

Surprise, surprise, another horrible Trump story has surfaced: Lil Jon has spoken out about the time that the presidential candidate kept calling him “Uncle Tom” on Celebrity Apprentice.

Apparently, even after a series of people explained why the term “Uncle Tom” is entirely offensive, the Donald Trump decided he was correct in using the term, persevered in using it, and generally made everyone feel really insulted and perplexed.

...more

Song of the Day: “When the Tequila Runs Out”

By

Dawes is one of a handful of groups, including peers like Wilco and Broken Social Scene, who have undergone personnel changes without losing the essential heart and soul that make them who they are. Their first manifestation in 2006 as the post-punk group Simon Dawes included the multi-talented guitarist and producer Blake Mills.

...more

Another Cease and Desist for Trump

By

Despite the number of artists who have explicitly requested their songs never again be used by the Republican candidate, who apparently does not believe in obtaining permission to use artistic work, Trump keeps upping the ante. Most recently, a campaign ad used “Seven Nation Army,” much to the chagrin of The White Stripes.

...more

Song of the Day: “Black and Blue”

By

Given the anarchic, traumatic, and deeply worrying events of recent months, some might begin to lose hope. However, music—and especially jazz, the most particularly American music—never seems to lose its power to soothe and calm us. Louis Armstrong, in a special song that might sound deceptively typical to the hasty listener, made a groundbreaking statement on race relations in his recording of the 1929 Fats Waller tune, “Black and Blue.” Rather than making a misguided apology for his own racial identity, as some have interpreted it, Armstrong’s incomparable dignity transforms the bluesy song into an ageless lament that rivals monumental recordings like Nina Simone’s “Strange Fruit.” Maybe we are all feeling a little black and blue today.

...more