Posts Tagged: adolescence

TORCH: Over the Borderline

By

I'm writing about the border through the eyes of children because the border is a problem of the imagination. ...more

The Butt Song

By

Last night as my husband got ready to go out [my daughter] grabbed his coat and said, “Call 1-900-Mix-A-Lot and kick those nasty thoughts.” ...more

Libraries Are the Real Punk Rock

By

Maybe I was only in the eighth grade, but I was ready to stand up to anyone who tried to threaten the ideal of intellectual freedom. ...more

I Choose My Pearls: On Feminism, Fashion, and Disneyland

By

Women don’t need laws to repress their fashion, comfort, identity, or preference. Our society’s deft ability to shame does all the heavy lifting. ...more

Voices on Addiction: Shame Is a Treble Hook

By

Shame is a treble hook that tells me that 1) I not only fail but am a failure, that 2) I not only damage people but I am damaged, and that 3) I not only lie but I am a lie. ...more

Saying What Shouldn’t Be Said: A Conversation with Julie Buntin

By

Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, why writing about teenage girls is the most serious thing in the world, and finding truths in fiction. ...more

How The Keepers Reframes Confession as a Feminist Act

By

Critics have noted how The Keepers is similar to other prestige documentaries but with a significant difference—its focus on the victims and their stories. ...more

TORCH: My American Playground

By

I left the car by the roadside and ran up the slope, in tears now, reaching the picnic tables and swings and, as bright and vivid as in my dreams, my purple-shaped climbing frame, exactly as I remembered it. ...more

Just Chaste Me

By

The more first-time stories I heard, the longer I was willing to wait. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

This week, a short story in the new issue of Cosmonauts Avenue turns the flashlight onto a slumber party, and not the fantasy pillow-fight and popcorn kind, but the more true-to-life kind, complete with paranormal library books, urban legends, sneaking out, and scaring the crap out of each other.

...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Julie Buntin

By

Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, the writers and books that influenced it, tackling addiction with compassion, and the magic of teenage girls. ...more

Written in Chalk: What It Means to Be Crazy

By

As truth becomes more elusive, as fact blends with fiction, we ought to take notice of how we categorize people, as categorization seems to be married to suppression, to disenfranchisement. ...more

Metaphors for My Forgetful Heart

By

My body is a drum, its last vibration fading out. My body is a temple, serene and contemplative, all voices finally stilled. My body is a glider plane, floating on warm currents of air in the eerie, engineless quiet. ...more

Sunday Rumpus Poetry: Three Poems by Amy Strauss Friedman

By

I thought that hearts were meant to function as uteri, / to grow linings that bleed clotty when life won’t adhere, / to stall like rusty engines in barren winters, / unprepared for the seasonal shift. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Viet Thanh Nguyen

By

Viet Than Nguyen discusses his story collection The Refugees, growing up in a Vietnamese community in San Jose in the 1980s, and the power of secondhand memories. ...more

Safety Nets: On Seeing Movies with My Children

By

There’s no blueprint for any of this. If there were, I would have read it by now. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: I Died of Dysentery

By

The glorious ways we fifth graders died in Mr. Mosher’s computer class. We strove to die in the most imaginable permutations possible. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jerald Walker

By

Jerald Walker discusses his memoir, The World in Flames: A Black Boyhood in a White Supremacist Doomsday Cult, the story of his childhood in The Worldwide Church of God, and how the act of writing delivered him from bitterness. ...more

An Ultimate Illustrated Fantasy Guide of Gilmore Girls Mashups

By

HOW AWESOME WOULD THESE MASHUPS BE? Oh well. Maybe next year. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Patrick Ryan

By

Patrick Ryan discusses his new collection The Dream Life of Astronauts, the “bad old days,” and the human need to believe that everything will turn out okay in the end (even when we know it won’t). ...more