Posts Tagged: Ann van Buren

The Rumpus Interview with André Alexis

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André Alexis discusses his latest book The Hidden Keys, puzzles, chance, divinity, and the Toronto literary community.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #54: Jade Chang on The Wangs vs. the World

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With a mix of humor, agility, and insight, Jade Chang’s debut novel, The Wangs vs. the World (HMH Books, October 2016), tells a fresh immigrant story. Charles Wang has left his native homeland to become a successful businessman in America. The book takes us on a journey with his whole family as they navigate the […]

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The Rumpus Interview With Alejandro Zambra

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Alejandro Zambra discusses his latest book, Multiple Choice, inspired by the Chilean exam administered to students seeking college admission

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The Rumpus Interview with Ravi Shankar

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Ravi Shankar discusses Singaporean poetry in the last fifty years, Hindu mythology, translation, and his complicated relationship to his heritage.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks mocks the electoral process in his illustrated narrative, “God Is Dead: Campaign Coverage.” Then, in the Saturday Essay, Kade Walker remembers her grandmother, a private woman of Jamaican descent who is too proud to tell her family she has cancer. Her secretiveness creates an additional layer of mystery around Walker’s memories of her. Next, […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Essay, Sandie Friedman uses classic works of Holocaust literature to put her everyday stresses into perspective. Friedman’s early studies of feminism and time abroad in Dresden get her thinking about identity politics, particularly her own Jewish identity. A realization of this “inheritance” leads her to the Holocaust narratives, which “immersed me in a world that […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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Happy Memorial Day! In this weekend’s Saturday Essay, Amanda Parrish Morgan returns to a favorite film of her childhood, Dead Poets Society, as a high school English teacher with a more critical eye. Parrish Morgan ties the sad “martyrdom” of the movie’s hero, Mr. Keating, in with the New York State Legislature’s new, unrealistic standards for […]

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