Posts Tagged: anxiety

The Dark All Around Us

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There is still light in the dark. This is the paradox that Little Bear has to accept in order to fall asleep. ...more

I Will Not Die for You

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Each bug in the water is one less bug on my fruit, I tell myself, ignoring the truth: under the soil, another is born. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #100: Jennifer Colville

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From the tender age of eight, Jennifer Colville has known herself to be a visual artist. ...more

An Experience and a Life and a Family: Talking with Scaachi Koul

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Scaachi Koul on her debut essay collection One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, learning to be patient with her own narrative, and three rules for book tours. ...more

Dispatches from the Swamp: I Watched the Comey Hearings in a DC Bar with a Face Full of Novocaine

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All of us, at some point over the last six months, have wished in one way or another that we could be anesthetized. That we could chemically numb the parts of our brains that flare out with anxiety every time our phones (those luminous portals of dread) vibrate with a news alert.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Cost of Intimacy

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Chasing intimacy can feel cheap—and yet intimacy we pay for can be meaningful. I find traditional therapy as awkward as sex, exposing my emotional self like I expose my body. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Gabrielle Bell

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Gabrielle Bell discusses her forthcoming graphic memoir, Everything Is Flammable, what it was like to mine her own life for subject matter, and how anxiety affects her work. ...more

Where You Put It on the Line: A Conversation with Mychal Denzel Smith

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Mychal Denzel Smith discusses his debut nonfiction book Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching, how the activist space has changed in recent years, and who he is writing for. ...more

TORCH: Blood Trauma

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But still: A pattern. The trauma had been diluted by time. But, it was still present, still discernible, in my blood. ...more

Album of the Week: Tei Shi’s Crawl Space

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Tei Shi is Valerie Teicher—born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, raised between Bogota, Colombia, and Vancouver, Canada, she now lives in New York after graduating from Boston’s Berklee College of Music. Her new album, Crawl Space, out now from Downtown Records, is her coming-of-age diary transposed into music.

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The Rumpus Interview with Ben Tanzer

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Ben Tanzer discusses his new essay collection Be Cool, why running is so important to him, and not being precious about his work. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Mila Jaroniec

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Mila Jaroniec talks about her debut novel Plastic Vodka Bottle Sleepover,” writing autofiction, the surprising similarity between selling sex toys and selling books, and the impact of having a baby on editing. ...more
Frightened Rabbit - The Midnight Organ Fight | Rumpus Music

Albums of Our Lives: Frightened Rabbit’s The Midnight Organ Fight

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Something about the twangy banjo and the melancholy vocals just made me feel less alone. And I hated being alone. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Naomi Jackson

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Naomi Jackson discusses her debut novel, The Star Side of Bird Hill, how she approached writing about mental illness and its affects on a family, and choosing to to tell a story from multiple perspectives. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #65: Amy Dupcak

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I first met Amy Dupcak at The Book Report Network in 2011, where she was an editorial assistant and I, a marketing assistant. We’d shoot off AOL Instant Messages to one another smirking over our computer screens, and leave simultaneously to take lunch.

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This Week in Essays

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Men will not protect you anymore. At Jezebel, Madeleine Davies advises that “now is a time for fury and force.”

Mark Binelli looks into life on the border town of Nogales for Guernica.

Here at The Rumpus, Matthew Clair writes about how we must do more than simply gaze upon suffering; actions speak louder than images.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: No Wound

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Maybe I can touch it and show it to you. If I convince you, we can call it real. And then perhaps it will be. ...more

Sound & Vision: Arthur Fournier

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Allyson McCabe talks with Arthur Fournier, an independent dealer of books, serials, manuscripts, and archives, about how he developed his niche, and how digital access has both enriched and complicated the work of archiving and collecting. ...more

My Voice for Their Drugs

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Anxiety disorients me from inside. My heart moves so erratically I’m afraid it will give out, my breath so staggered I have to remind myself to take in air. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Esmé Weijun Wang

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Esmé Weijun Wang discusses her first novel, The Border of Paradise, about a multi-generational new American family, creative expression through writing and photography, and interracial relationships. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: How to Become a Tiger

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Tigers are bigger than my comprehension. That’s what I want. I want to be bigger than I am, so big I can’t even imagine it, so real I can’t ever be misinterpreted. ...more

Fresh Comics #12: Rolling Blackouts

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Some books take such a mammoth effort to produce that it’s hard to want to be critical of them. Rolling Blackouts is one of those books. The nearly 300 pages of delicately crafted, watercolored panels make evident that Sarah Glidden is a workhorse of a talent.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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What would you give to be happy, fun, anxiety-free? Would you give your soul? This is the question Deirdre Coyle asks in her story “Fun Person,” up at Hobart this week. The story opens with the narrator vomiting on the sidewalk outside of a bar, but not for the obvious reasons one might vomit in such a location.

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Taking on Your Shelf of Blank Notebooks

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At Catapult, Rachel Vorona Cote takes readers down a path of struggle that far too many writers walk, but aren’t always able to talk about or understand. In “Black Books and Letting the Ink Dry,” Vorona Cote looks at the “paradox of the blank book”:

The paradox of the blank book is this: It invites our most intimate scribbles while its creamy, pristine pages cast doubt upon the merit of our words.

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