Posts Tagged: capitalism

Faith, Gods, and Gay Sex: A Conversation with Matthew Gallaway

By

Matthew Gallaway discusses his second novel, #gods, moving from a big publishing house to an indie press, and why it was important to him to depict gay sex in writing. ...more

Empathy Is Cheap: A Conversation with Brandon Harris

By

Brandon Harris discusses his memoir Making Rent in Bed-Stuy, gentrification in New York City and Brooklyn, the homogenization of American cities by corporate America, and whiteness of film culture. ...more

Staying Syncretic: A Conversation with Kool A.D.

By

Kool A.D. discusses his debut novel, OK, the war on drugs, systemic destruction of left-leaning movements by the government, and the inability to escape American capitalism. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

By

Are great bookstores just good capitalism?

People are more concerned with being fat than with eating disorders, if we go by the number of books in each respective section at one blogger’s local bookstore.

A Tennessee bookstore will include a restaurant inside of it.

...more

The Business of Making Art: A Conversation with Beatriz Ramos

By

Beatriz Ramos discusses DADA, the digital platform she hopes will democratize art and reimagine the Internet's potential for visual artists. ...more

(K)ink: Writing While Deviant: Kirsten Irving

By

The pressure to prove ourselves can have a distorting effect, causing us to doubt our instincts in favor of following others we perceive to be experts or “genuine.” ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Nikki Wallschlaeger

By

Nikki Wallschlaeger discusses her new collection Crawlspace, why she chose to work with the sonnet form, and how segregation in American never ended. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Chen Chen

By

Chen Chen discusses his new collection When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities, playing the game white supremacy has set up, and if God is trying and failing to be a cool dad. ...more

Corinne Lee and Finding an Antidote to America’s Toxicity

By

Poet Corinne Lee on writing her epic book-length poem Plenty and finding new ways to live in a rapidly changing world. ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #22: Poverty Is Never “Genteel”

By

Poverty may have been beloved of St. Francis, but not so much by the rest of us. Nobody likes to look at advanced poverty, toothless and drooling, clutching the hands of children who have running sores on their filthy legs. Poverty is a crackhead who pisses on the pavement, and sleeps with fleas and stray dogs.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jon Day

By

Jon Day discusses his memoir, Cyclogeography: Journeys of a London Bicycle Courier, the bicycle as a symbol of gentrification, and the city as "a technology for living." ...more

Color at the Mercy of the Light

By

What if I said: while people still believe they are white in America, that delusion, and the dream upon which it is founded, needs to be seriously examined. ...more

Sex, Money, and Art Forgery

By

“Novels about psychically and sexually burdened paintings have a rich literary pedigree,” writes UNC Professor of Art History Maggie Cao for Public Books. Cao’s essay tackles the subject of forgery, which puts “the intimate, almost magical role that works of art play in people’s emotional and erotic lives” into conversation with modern market forces that have, as of late, transformed art collectors from neurotic worshippers of art to high-tech investors.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Ben Ehrenreich

By

Ben Ehrenreich, author of The Way to the Spring: Life and Death in Palestine, discusses oppression, objectivity in journalism, and millennial politics. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Andi Zeisler

By

Andi Zeisler, co-founder of Bitch and author of the new book We Were Feminists Once: From Riot Grrl to CoverGirl, discusses capitalism, breast implants, pop culture, and feminism. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Danniel Schoonebeek

By

Danniel Schoonebeek discusses living a quiet life in the Catskills, the importance of travel, partying in the woods with poets, and how capitalism forces people to be cruel to each other. ...more

Reading for a Paycheck

By

At Electric Literature, Nick Politan reports on a new study that suggests that reading in childhood has a link to financial success in adulthood. Politan, however, is critical of the study, which he argues reduces books to their “capitalist value”:

Can “books” not be something(s) — at least for a reader — positively stripped of their economic jackets?

...more

Reckoning with the Bros: Trump, Bly, and Swimming in the Sea of Grief

By

There are dark forces roiling beneath the surface of American life. ...more

Harvesting Our Desires

By

What can the medium of the video game tell us about our collective desires as a society? According to Alfie Brown’s essay for The New Inquiry, a lot actually. The author details how our fascinations with apocalypse gaming and pastoral farming simulations reflect two distinct responses to the hopelessness of capitalism:

Their picture of a lost era of tightly knit villages where humans lived in organic harmony with nature complements prophesies of a dystopic future in which humans are regimented components of a remorseless capitalistic machine.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Campbell McGrath

By

Campbell McGrath talks about his new collection, XX: Poems For The Twentieth Century, capitalism, history, and what it might mean to write a wordless poem. ...more

The Conversation: Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib and Paul Tran

By

The sitting down to write, convincing myself that my voice matters, even though there are so many telling me that it doesn’t. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jessa Crispin

By

Jessa Crispin talks about The Dead Ladies Project and The Creative Tarot, founding Bookslut, why she has an antagonistic relationship with the publishing industry, and her estrangement from modern feminism. ...more

Rihanna’s Anti Capitalist Strategy

By

Although it marks a turn away from the hit-heavy model of a record industry money-maker, Rihanna’s Anti is still a calculated capitalist move, and the Atlantic explains how. In an editorial examination of record release strategies, the Atlantic connects the dots between Samsung’s sponsorship of the new record and how Rihanna is making money by giving the new album away for free.

...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Valuation Methods

By

In some of my fantasies, I make a pitch for art or for truth, defend them like commodities. ...more

Exposure Doesn’t Pay Your Rent

By

Last week, author and Star Trek actor Wil Wheaton wrote an essay about the seven things he did to reboot his life. The Huffington Post, a publisher recently purchased by Verizon Communications for $4.4 billion, offered Wheaton the opportunity to republish the essay in exchange for the “unique platform and reach our site provides.” Wheaton declined.

...more

Profits Over Integrity

By

Universities have spent the last several decades expanding the number of adjunct professors they hire, reducing full-time faculty and paying pauper’s wages to these part-time employees. Samuel Hazo explains how cutting full-time faculty is a disservice to academics in the pursuit of profits:

However, the recent trend toward hiring adjunct teachers and professors, competent though they may be, is part of the problem, as universities save and accrue money by not hiring full-time faculty.

...more