Posts Tagged: charles dickens

It’s Only a Matter of Time: A Conversation with Jack Driscoll

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Jack Driscoll discusses The Goat Fish and the Lover’s Knot, “the impermanence of everything,” and how he chooses his characters’ names.

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Notable NYC: 12/10–12/16

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Saturday 12/10: Mike Albo, Sandra Bauleo, Alexander Chee, Marcy Dermansky, Natalie Diaz, Elif Batuman, Angela Flournoy, Jill Hennessy, Alice Sola Kim, Téa Obreht, Rosie Schaap, Elissa Schappell, Parul Sehgal, Jamil Smith, Rob Spillman, Emma Straub, Peter Straub, J. Courtney Sullivan, Marie-Helene Bertino, Ted Dodson, Chinelo Okparanta, Lisa Lucas and others read from Charles Dicken’s A […]

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Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #21: John Irving

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And that is how I feel about John Irving novels. That they gave me everything.

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Dickens and the Lottery

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If you’re disappointed you didn’t win the Powerball jackpot, head over to NPR to read Charles Dickens’s account of the lottery in Naples, an event he seemed to find both amusing and horrifying: Dickens heard of a man being thrown fatally from his horse, only to be pounced on by a punter—a person who places a […]

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We Wish You A Literary Christmas

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From Dickens to Nabokov to Ali Smith, Kate Webb traces the history of authors pondering Christmas, and the 21st century revival of the Christmas story: Even in our prickly individualism, hemmed in by consumer goods, there are moments when we can escape from safe, homogenized lives to experience the tingling pleasures of heat and cold, […]

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Famous Writers with Weird Jobs

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Did you know that Chuck Palahniuk worked as a bike messenger? Or that both Stephen King and Ken Kesey worked as janitors? Or that Charles Dickens labeled jars in a shoe factory? Electric Literature has a fun infographic detailing these odd jobs and more. This should make writers of any stage feel better about the weird […]

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Charles Dickens is a Tattle-Tale

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Get ready for the biggest piece of gossip to hit the Victorian litmag scene in 250 years. Lewis Carroll, Wilkie Collins, and Elizabeth Gaskell all wrote anonymously for Charles Dickens’s periodical—but that anonymity may have been short-lived. (Well, sort of.) In a reveal heralded as “the Rosetta Stone of Victorian studies,” a book dealer found […]

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Nightwalking with Dickens

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Long walks are among the most common creative practices, we’re told, for writers from a certain era: Wordsworth, Thoreau, and Blake come quickly to mind. Matthew Beaumont’s new Nightwalking: A Nocturnal History of London from Verso is a treasure trove of stories about these ambulating authors, and Flavorwire has a piece about how walking after […]

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A Dickensian History of Capitalism

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…we should return to the pages of Dickens and Trollope to remind ourselves that there were wrong ’uns at every level and turn of 19th-century commerce, from crooked agents, clerks, brokers and jobbers to ‘lords on the take, knights on the make’ — and that ‘the thieves were often difficult to distinguish from the legitimate’, […]

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Dickens Gave Us Christmas, and Ghosts

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Today there is plenty of fretting over the “War on Christmas,” but the holiday didn’t always hold such importance in everyday lives, even for Christians. Two hundred years ago, industrialization gave people a lot more to worry about than Black Friday sales and eggnog-soaked office holiday parties. The Guardian credits Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol […]

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Getting Drunk with Bob Cratchit

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Charles Dickens loves a good punch, and the alcoholic concoctions make appearances in many of his novels. The perhaps least fortunate of his characters, Bob Cratchit, drinks a punch made of gin and lemon. Although the text only refers to two ingredients, its likely referencing a much more complicated mixed drink—Slate investigates the recipe the […]

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Word of the Day: Horometry

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(n.); the art, practice, or method of measuring time by hours and subordinate divisions; the art or science of measuring time; from the Greek hora (“time” or “season”) + metron (“measure”) With them who stood upon the brink of the great gulf which none can see beyond, Time, so soon to lose itself in vast […]

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Go to the Library Without Leaving Your House

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If you liked learning about fore-edge paintings, you’ll love the New York Public Library’s Tumblr. And the Smithsonian Libraries’ Tumblr. And the University of Iowa’s Special Collections & University Archives Tumblr. And all the other library blogs linked in this MetaFilter post, which upload pictures of all kinds of nifty stuff from their stacks, from “the original […]

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God Bless Us, Every Lowell Mill Girl

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Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol is so beloved a classic that names like “Scrooge” and “the ghost of Christmas past” have entered our daily lexicon, and we continue to reinterpret the story every few years with everything from cartoon ducks to Muppets. But Dickens wasn’t the first person to write about holiday-season redemption or ghosts who […]

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A Literary Hoax as Weird as the Dickens

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“When Dickens Met Dostoevsky,” a recent article in the Times Literary Supplement, starts out at the highest echelons of writerdom: Michiko Kakutani discusses an encounter between Charles Dickens and Fyodor Dostoevsky, in which Dickens describes creating his stories’ villains from his own worst impulses. But with each new development in the story, we sink a little […]

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Notable New York, This Week 12/14 – 12/19

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This week in New York Rumpus Women take over!, New Yorker writer’s 20 Under 40 share their stories, Jonathan Ames and Justin Taylor are among writers who read from A Christmas Carol, J.D. Durkin pleads Stephen Colbert: Hire Me!, this month’s Soundtrack Series, and Tiny Furniture is this week’s Saturday Movie Pick.

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“Sonnet like allusions are made to your gilt silk hair”

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Next week, 600,000 pages of manuscripts, letters, drafts and journals will be put online from canonical British authors like Oscar Wilde, the Bronte sisters, Charles Dickens and others. Included will be correspondence between Wilde and many of his lovers, including Lord Alfred Douglas, or “Bosie.” The Marquis of Queensbury, Bosie’s father, despised Wilde, and Wilde […]

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