Posts Tagged: copyright

Sound & Vision: Matt Sullivan

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Allyson McCabe talks with Matt Sullivan, founder of Light in the Attic Records, about how he’s preserved the label's commitment to great music while also meeting the demands of a changing, and often challenging, market. ...more

The Copyright Saga Continues

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A new copyright lawsuit has been initiated against Bruno Mars and Mark Ronson for their single “Uptown Funk.” Collage, a funk band out of Minneapolis, alleges that the hit rips the instrumentals of their 1983 song “Young Girls”:

Upon information and belief, many of the main instrumental attributes and themes of “Uptown Funk” are deliberately and clearly copied from “Young Girls,” including, but not limited to, the distinct funky specifically noted and timed consistent guitar riffs present throughout the compositions, virtually if not identical bass notes and sequence, rhythm, structure, crescendo of horns and synthesizers rendering the compositions almost indistinguishable if played over each other and strikingly similar if played in consecutively.

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The Rumpus Interview with John Reed

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John Reed discusses Snowball’s Chance, his parody of Animal Farm, and the lawsuits, debates, and discoveries that followed the book's publication. ...more

Artists Petition Against Streaming Enablers

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A long list of known and respected musicians from a wide variety of genres have signed a petition against the systemic enabling of illegal streaming provided by entities such as YouTube and Google.

The petition urges Congress to reform the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which protects companies that host user sharing from being held accountable for copyright infringement if they take down offending videos or songs when requested by the artist.

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Axl Rose Not Pumped on Fat Memes

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Axl Rose has issued Google a takedown notice regarding the “Fat Axl” meme, which uses a shot of the singer performing with Guns N’ Roses in 2010. The notice is operating on the grounds that Guns N’ Roses owns the copyright to all photos taken at the band’s performances, according to a waiver all photographers must sign before any show.

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Intellectual Property’s Much-Needed Evolution

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World Intellectual Property Day, the greatest of all spring holidays, was this Tuesday, April 26th. In honor of the holiday, the UK’s Intellectual Property Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe made a statement calling for an update in the legal concept, Billboard reports:

The process of digitization has transformed the world around us at a furious pace.

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Google vs. Author’s Guild

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The fight against Google’s digital library continues, and this time the effort has support from big-name authors like Margaret Atwood, Ursula K. Le Guin, Malcolm Gladwell, Peter Carey, and J. M. Coetzee. The case against Google making millions of books—many of them still under copyright protection—searchable online without paying for any licenses to do so goes back to 2005. 

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The “Blurred Lines” of Copyright

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The question of copyright infringement in Pharell Williams’s and Robin Thicke’s song “Blurred Lines” has been raised again, following an appeal that the pair filed this Monday against the March decision that ruled against the use of Marvin Gaye’s “Got to Give It Up” in the song’s instrumentals.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Rick Moody

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Rick Moody about his new book Hotels of North America, unreliable narrators, hotel porn, how titles are uncopyrightable, and Internet comment sections. ...more

Russian Publisher Steals Authors’ Names

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Several western authors have had their names pirated by a Russian publisher that prints books about Vladimir Putin, reports the Guardian. The journalists, analysts, and authors did not write the books nor did they know about their publication. The Russian language books were published by Algoritm, a two-decades old publisher of controversial political and social content.

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Fifty More Shades of Grey (And Counting)

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Prospects for your serialized proto-fictional new generation adaptation of The Hunger Games are bright. As fan fiction solidifies its status as a literary genre in its own right, publishers are catching on:

…what was once viewed as either uncreative, a legal morass of copyright issues, or both, is now seen as a potential savior for a publishing industry still finding its moorings in the age of digital media.

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It’s Fair Use, My Dear Watson

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There’s been no shortage of Sherlock Holmes spin-offs in the past few years, and with the Supreme Court’s decision not  to hear a case from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s estate, contemporary re-imaginings of the detective savant will continue to thrive. The Guardian reports that by refusing to consider an appeal of a seventh-circuit court decision naming all but the last ten Holmes books public domain, the high court has sent a clear message that licensing fees demanded by the estate aren’t kosher for works whose copyright has expired.

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Why We All Can’t Be J.K. Rowling

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After a panel at the House of Commons about copyright issues, author Joanne Harris writes in the Telegraph about the difficulty of being successful within the publishing industry. Among other factors, she attributes some of the failure to readers’ misconceptions about the lives of writers:

Part of the problem…is that, thanks to the media, the public has a distorted view of what the average author’s life is like.

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The Fair Use Posse

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The Authors Alliance officially launches on May 21st at the Internet Archive in San Francisco. The group, founded by Pam Samuelson, Cory Doctorow, Katie Hafner, Kevin Kelly and Jonathan Lethem, is aimed at digital writers and will “represent the authors who like fair use, users’ rights, and who reject censorship and surveillance,” Doctorow stated at Boing Boing.

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Public (Image) Domain

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What happens when the reproduction rights of literary works and an author’s public image are taken out of their owner’s control, but without any law infringement?

Over at the Paris Review, Evan Kindley tries to find out. He compares the case of the upcoming David Foster Wallace movie, adapted from David Lipsky’s memoir Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself, to what happened to James Joyce when Ulysses was reprinted by another author in the U.S., where the book wasn’t under copyright.

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