Posts Tagged: death

Barrio Antiguo 211

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Casa Azul Cripple

By

“I wanted to be sexual/sexualized, but not fetishized. But was becoming someone’s fetish the only way? How was being fetishized different than being desired for having a unique, unrepeatable shape…or would the one leg always and forever be the only thing that mattered?”

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

This Sunday, Ted Wilson turned five. Happy anniversary, Ted!

In the latest “Last Book I Loved,” Michelle King finds a kindred spirit in Sylvia Plath, who, the first time she kissed husband Ted Hughes, allegedly bit his cheek and drew blood.

...more

Image 5

The New York Comics and Picture-Story Symposium: Tom Hart and Leela Corman

By

The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium is a weekly forum for discussing the tradition and future of text/image work. Open to the public, it meets Monday nights at 7-9 p.m. EST in New York City.

...more

Lost Words For A Spruce Tree

By

Over at The Hairpin, Isabelle Fraser interviews Ann Wroe, obituary writer for The Economist. Wroe has written obituaries for J.D. Salinger, Aaron Swartz, and the 25-year old carp that was “England’s best-loved fish”. On Marie Smith, the last person to speak Eyak, an Alaskan language, she relates:

“She was the only person left who remembered all the different words for all the parts of a spruce tree.

...more

Fatal Short Stories

By

Depictions of death in short stories can challenge even seasoned writers. John McDonough, writing in the Colorado Review, explains why:

The immediacy of the death of a loved one offers rich emotional possibilities, but ones that are remarkably complicated. Mine these emotions too heavily and you run the risk of sentimentality, but too cautious an approach fails to carry appropriate weight.

...more

CraneAuthorPhoto

Super Hot Prof-on-Student Word Sex #12: Antonia Crane, The Dirty Dozenth

By

And this is precisely why I was so entirely blown away by Antonia Crane’s new memoir, Spent, which chronicles her dark and twisted path through the above horrors with remarkable elegance and restraint. To be honest: it’s pretty fucking annoying how elegant and restrained the book is.

...more

Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

By

When my father died my mother was still alive. And I think when your second parent dies, there is that shock: “Oh man, I’m an orphan.” There’s also this relief: It’s done; it’s finished; it’s over. Because I had felt for so many years that there was this sense of going through this whole passage, this whole last part of their lives, and all the emotional and practical difficulties of that.

...more