Posts Tagged: depression

Conversations with Writers Braver Than Me #19: Jason Diamond

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Jason Diamond discusses his memoir Searching for John Hughes, confronting his childhood abuse, avoiding his parents, and writing about all of it. ...more

Frightened Rabbit - The Midnight Organ Fight | Rumpus Music

Albums of Our Lives: Frightened Rabbit’s The Midnight Organ Fight

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Something about the twangy banjo and the melancholy vocals just made me feel less alone. And I hated being alone. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Naomi Jackson

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Naomi Jackson discusses her debut novel, The Star Side of Bird Hill, how she approached writing about mental illness and its affects on a family, and choosing to to tell a story from multiple perspectives. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jade Sharma

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Jade Sharma discusses her first novel Problems, the complicated feelings that came with debuting to rave reviews, and her writing and editing processes. ...more

Visible: Women Writers of Color #5: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: No Wound

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Maybe I can touch it and show it to you. If I convince you, we can call it real. And then perhaps it will be. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #64: Lianne Stokes

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Hi there! We’re the two brunettes who hate sex. Sara-Kate hates sex because it’s too aerobic—she once sprained her foot. She lives in Kips Bay, loves candy, and wears exclusively rompers. Elisa Jordana hates sex because she abhors the human penis and all its functions.

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My Voice for Their Drugs

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Anxiety disorients me from inside. My heart moves so erratically I’m afraid it will give out, my breath so staggered I have to remind myself to take in air. ...more

The Alienation of an Irish Abortion

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Was it a dream? A nightmare? I felt like I’d been sold a lie. There was no husband or caring partner, no safe home or solid income. Just me, pregnant and alone, in an abortion clinic with my rapist. ...more

This Week in Essays

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At Lit Hub, Jonathan Reiber, a former speechwriter for the Obama administration, weighs our souls and our words during this political transition.

Chivas Sandage writes for The Rumpus about helping the men in our lives to fully understand the constant state of vigilance women live in.

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The Front Bottoms - The Front Bottoms | Rumpus Music

Albums of Our Lives: The Front Bottoms’ The Front Bottoms

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When I first heard Brian Sella’s sweet, pathetic voice sing these words, they seared a sense of guilt into me. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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What would you give to be happy, fun, anxiety-free? Would you give your soul? This is the question Deirdre Coyle asks in her story “Fun Person,” up at Hobart this week. The story opens with the narrator vomiting on the sidewalk outside of a bar, but not for the obvious reasons one might vomit in such a location.

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Bittersweet Symphony

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Though it’s clichéd and maladaptive to cast mental illness as the wellspring of great writing, to write about one’s life honestly often means writing about one’s mental illness. In an essay for Catapult, Colin Dickey writes lushly about his experiences with depression, musing on the historical conceptions of melancholy and how perhaps our highly clinical and problematized category of depression could afford to be complicated by it:

What I called my depression is the feeling one gets as the world shades away, as though a silent wall of water is holding everything else at a remove.

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Rosanne Cash - Black Cadillac | Rumpus Music

Albums of Our Lives: Rosanne Cash’s Black Cadillac

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In her voice, I am held, cradled even. I am equal parts longing and hope. I am home. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Heirlooms

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The strings of our DNA mark us as one, but it’s the roots of our memories that bind us. ...more

Letters to Laura from a McDonald’s in Brooklyn

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Tonight my loneliness is infinite and I could eat dinner or dance with my limbs wild because there is no gravity keeping me grounded. ...more

Self-Love Stew

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In her essay at Hazlitt, “Watch Me Bathe,” Jess Carroll shares that she barely bathes, and tells us that it’s for the better—in fact, it’s like reverse self-love and self-care, as we’ve come to think of those terms now. She rejects the idea that mental health is balanced on a teetering tower of meticulous hygiene routines, and that the only way to stay sane is to wash, rinse, and repeat as if unconcerned with anything else.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Instructions for Replicating a Bad Summer

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Compare yourself to a raw wound. Explain that everyone else is one too, whether they know it or not. ...more

Unlinking Mental Illness and Creativity

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The idea that “mental illness is the heart of creativity” has persisted for decades. But this idea can negatively impact one’s ability to seek help that they truly need. At The Establishment, Sarah Bronson debunks the notion that treating mental illnesses like depression unilaterally has a negative impact on one’s ability to create:

I recognize that not all mental illnesses are alike and that some people actually appreciate how their illness uniquely empowers them.

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Mind Over Genre

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Over at Lit Hub, Jennifer R. Bernstein confronts the disciplinary rift that has grown between psychology and literature to show how the two are linked, even nested inside one another in our studies of self and pain:

For these authors were writing literature of a kind; you could hear it in the music of their prose and their command of figurative language.

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The Rumpus Interview With Brenda Miller

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Author Brenda Miller discusses the lyric essay, her "poet self" who always bleeds through, and what she's writing about next. ...more