Posts Tagged: education

mr-clarke-feature

Mr. Clarke, the Real Hero of Stranger Things

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He’s the teacher who encourages questions beyond the class assessment, who always gets his students to open the “Curiosity Door.” ...more

Writing by Hand

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There are those who bemoan schools’ decisions to stop teaching cursive, and those who welcome the decision with keyboard in hand. John Oppenheimer, writing for the New Yorker, talks about writing to his daughters at summer camp using cursive, even though they have some trouble deciphering the script and his body isn’t so fond of handwriting:

By the time that I had covered two sides of a small piece of stationery, my letters tended to get sloppier, and my right hand was cramping.

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Year of Light and Dark feature

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: The Year of Light and Dark

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It isn’t much of a contest to say that Julie Coyne is the single most inspirational human being I have ever met. And I am here—in Xela—in part because I could use a little inspiration. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Nina Stibbe

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Author Nina Stibbe discusses her new novel Paradise Lodge, our obsession with character likeability, and how she more than flirts with feminism. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with John Reed

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John Reed discusses Snowball’s Chance, his parody of Animal Farm, and the lawsuits, debates, and discoveries that followed the book's publication. ...more

Reading Outside the Curriculum

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Unseen, a literary magazine founded by Singaporean university students, wants us to release ourselves from “the pressure-cooker environment of examinations” and all the literature we’re required to read for them. The Unseen creators believe that reading outside of the curriculum encourages literary creativity and exploration, and want to spread the wealth to their peers everywhere.

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Literature as Expression, Exchange, and Peace

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Everything make sense if you’re an artist.

At the Dallas Observer, Caroline North exchanged a few words with current US Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera, who is kicking off his second term with a book tour and several forthcoming projects, including The Technicolor Adventures of Catalina Neon, a series of coloring books written by and for elementary-aged kids, with the goal of introduction children to the power of finding their voice through the written word.

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The Rumpus Interview with Asali Solomon

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Asali Solomon discusses her debut novel, Disgruntled, narrative structure, the mythology of memory and place, and returning to Philadelphia after years away. ...more

The Ladies’ University Experience

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Donna Drucker writes for Notches on the Dean of Women’s Office at Purdue University. The Dean of Women’s Office was the late 1960s predecessor to the university’s modern-day Dean of Students role. In her piece, Drucker looks at the period-specific complaints and concerns registered by female students, and how the office addressed a wide range of issues on sexuality during this time period.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Making a Murderer and “Bad” Families

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There were “good” families and “bad” families, and even I, an outsider, was quickly apprised of which was which. ...more

Apocalypse Now

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Take that, Mom and Dad. Turns out studying literature can be practical. The Atlantic looks at the evolution of climate fiction, a new genre that’s getting readers interested in environmental issues and inspiring students to study STEM subjects:

In this respect, cli-fi is a truly modern literary phenomenon: born as a meme and raised into a distinct genre by the power of social media.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Bill Cosby’s Faux Legacy

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Bill Cosby was never the man, the icon, the protector and illustrator of black culture, the guide, the genius we have created in our minds. ...more

Keep It Simple

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Recently, several novelists have criticized the primary curriculum in the UK for teaching a brand of creative writing that is too “complex.” For the Guardian, Ella Slater explains why she agrees with such criticism, arguing that her primary education has made writing simple and direct prose difficult:

As someone now struggling with keeping my prose simple and fluent, I can only say that I regret that the primary curriculum left so much to the secondary.

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Rising Costs, Failing Students

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Colleges and universities cannot be expected to solve America’s problems of inequity. They cannot repair broken families, or make up for learning deficits incurred early in childhood, or “level the playing field” for students with inadequate preparation. But they should be expected to try to mitigate these problems rather than worsen them—and one main reason they are failing to do so is their relentlessly rising cost.

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Stop Measuring the Humanities with Dollar Signs

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Even though liberal arts degrees are actually good for business, Matt Burriesci (author of Dead White Guys: A Father, His Daughter, and the Great Books of the Western World) believes that supporters of the humanities should lay that argument to rest:

A liberal arts education … may not teach you how to change your oil or program a website, but it prepares you to learn any skill, and most importantly, to question how any task is performed, challenge conventional wisdom, and introduce new processes.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Reading Don Quijote with My Mother

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“That’s the anthem I would have sung at my original graduation if the university had stayed open,” my mother said. ...more