Posts Tagged: Emily Dickinson

Faith and Identity: Fireworks in the Graveyard by Joy Ladin

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To “ameliorate” the desire for death or the sense of self-annihilation, Ladin finds in religion a way of reconciliation, not only within herself, but also with her community and society at large.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #131: Lisa Wells

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“I always feel like I’m starting over. I don’t know how I ever wrote a poem. I really do have that feeling.”

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Terese Mailhot

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Terese Mailhot discusses her debut memoir, Heart Berries, writing candidly about one’s personal life, and the good that can come from anger.

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On Joy: Three Poetry Anthologies

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With impermanence and “praise for the devil” all around, it’s a gift to rediscover joy, no matter how fleeting.

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It’s All Metaphorical: A Conversation with Laurette Folk

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Laurette Folk discusses her new collection, Totem Beasts, the role of meditation and dreams in her work, and “seeking some heightened experience in the conscious world.”

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What to Read When You Want to Feel Thankful

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Kick off the holiday season with a list of books that Rumpus editors are thankful for!

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On Speaking Plainly: A Conversation with Rajith Savanadasa

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Rajith Savanadasa discusses his debut novel, Ruins, writing across oceans, and the chance encounter with refugees that led to the story at the heart of his novel.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #85: Elizabeth Metzger

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I have known the poet Elizabeth Metzger since kindergarten—and ever since I have known her, she has been a poet. When we played the The Game of Life, a board game, she wrote small lyrics about the futures we ended the game with; when I had a crush, she wrote light verse about the boys […]

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The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Pandora and the Naked Dead Woman

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Bite that apple, open that jar at your own risk and see how your garden grows, how hopeful you remain. Paradise is, after all, blissful self-ignorance.

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My Voice for Their Drugs

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Anxiety disorients me from inside. My heart moves so erratically I’m afraid it will give out, my breath so staggered I have to remind myself to take in air.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Jaimee Wriston Colbert

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Life’s inequities can be cruel, but in the end we are all part of our communities; suffering though we may be, we are not alone.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Jericho Parms

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What is lost still has substance, is malleable, can take on new impressions, and be molded again to our experience, often resulting in the most lasting force that determines how we see the world.

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A Death Blow Can Be a Life Blow to Some

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What does it mean to be carried away? To be captured, carried off, liberated? To lose control of oneself? Lerner doesn’t show concern for questions like these. More generally, The Hatred of Poetry takes little interest in the rarities of technique across a poet’s body of work and avoids questions about his or her sense […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Connie Wanek

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Connie Wanek discusses her latest book, Rival Gardens: New and Selected Poems, the challenge of looking back at older poems, and what prioritizing writing looks like.

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Naturally Emily Dickinson

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I became tantalized by the idea of a genius poet whose talent was nourished not by extensive travel, nor by formal literary training, but rather by an intimacy with the kinds of creatures Americans routinely encounter and rarely appreciate. For Slate, Ferris Jabr dives deep into the imagery of Emily Dickinson’s poetry to find new […]

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Emily Dickinson Wasn’t Crazy

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Emily Dickinson continues to appeal to literary critics fascinated by her poetry’s terse and alarming emotional breadth. Many biographies attribute her emotional poetry to a sense of agoraphobia, but at Lit Hub, Jerome Charyn makes the case for Emily Dickinson as a more complicated and clever character who was very aware of how the emotion […]

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The Amazing Disappearing Woman Writer

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To refuse to disappear at mid-life—I am forty-two as of the writing of this essay—is perhaps the best rebellion a woman poet can make to the literary world and to the world at large.

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The Last Book I Loved: Sheila Levine Is Dead and Living In New York

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But when my loneliness feels as vast—and capable of drowning me—as the sea, this book about self-destruction comforts me more than any self-help.

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The Rumpus Interview with Amy Fusselman

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Amy Fusselman discusses her latest memoir/manifesto/philosophical treatise Savage Park, the rise of a new kind of nonfiction, and what kind of art “discombobulates her and makes her scream.”

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Cornerstones of American Poetry

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The only way I can put it is, no American poet I have ever met regardless of disposition or poetics has disliked Frank Stanford’s poems.

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