Posts Tagged: essays

How We Cycle through Our Lives: Talking with Chelsey Clammer

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Chelsey Clammer discusses her new essay collection, Circadian, her writing process, and the body as text. ...more

Going Off-Script: A Conversation with Mandy Len Catron

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Mandy Len Catron discusses How to Fall in Love with Anyone: A Memoir in Essays, what makes for a thoughtful love story, and the politics of love. ...more

At the Boundaries of Genre: Talking with Lily Hoang

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Lily Hoang discusses her first essay collection, A Bestiary, the importance of genre, and the lessons of teaching. ...more

What Do I Do With My Fear?: A Conversation with Megan Stielstra

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Megan Stielstra discusses her new essay collection, The Wrong Way to Save Your Life, fear, privilege, and the intersection of politics and everyday life. ...more

This Week in Essays

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Alexandra Wuest tackles grief, art, and the insights solitude can offer over at Fanzine.

For Real Life, Eleanor Penny asks the big questions about and considers the implications of the creation of an artificial womb.

Here at The Rumpus, Zoe Fisher recalls finding a radical sanctuary in her local library as a teenager.

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Navigating Empathy: Camille T. Dungy’s Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood, and History

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Luckily for us, Dungy’s increase in empathy and experience coincides with her embrace of the braided essay: her thinking crashes people, places, and ideas against each other in unexpected and adventurous ways. ...more

An Experience and a Life and a Family: Talking with Scaachi Koul

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Scaachi Koul on her debut essay collection One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, learning to be patient with her own narrative, and three rules for book tours. ...more

This Week in Essays

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In a stunning bit of reportage at Guernica, Lacy M. Johnson looks at the costs of laying nuclear waste to rest, and at the impact doing so has had on one particular St. Louis suburb.

For Nowhere, Hillary Kaylor finds there’s little she can do to help the kids who spend their days scavenging a dump in Cambodia.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Samantha Irby

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Samantha Irby discusses her new collection, We Are Never Meeting in Real Life, her reluctance to call herself a writer, and writing for the “cream jeans” crowd. ...more

This Week in Essays

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“There may be freedom in America but it is not for me.” At Catapult, Kenechi Uzor reminds us that not every immigrant story is an uncomplicated, happy one.

Mallika Rao writes for the Atlantic on the the beloved web series Brown Girls, its coming leap to HBO, and the promise of more complex narratives for people of color.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Samantha Irby

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Samantha Irby discusses her new essay collection, We Are Never Meeting in Real Life, all that comes along with writing about your life, and reading great horror books. ...more

Reality Scooped: Talking with Tony Tulathimutte

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Recent Whiting Award winner Tony Tulathimutte discusses his first novel, Private Citizens, the state of satire in 2017, “booby-trapping” identity politics, and productivity in the Internet age. ...more

This Week in Essays

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For The Smart Set, Natasha Burge walks the streets of Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and examines the ways both cities and selves can change through time.

In this latest Multitudes installment for The Rumpus, Christine No writes a stunning piece on family and attempts at healing.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Amy Benson

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Our American obsession with the personal and individual has made us the tremendous resource consumers we are in the world. ...more

This Week in Essays

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Take an immersive trip down the Maine coast with Porter Fox at Nowhere magazine.

For The Rumpus, Nancy Jooyoun Kim examines the bizarre dynamics and privilege within the world of tourism.

At The Offing, Gabrielle Montesanti’s reflections on piss are pretty great.

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Allowing a Female to Own Her Genius: Talking with Alana Massey

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Alana Massey discusses her debut collection, All the Lives I Want, the best piece of writing advice she's ever received, and acknowledging the work that women do. ...more

Blur, Cross, Pulverize, Confront, Remember: Talking with James Allen Hall

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James Allen Hall on I Liked You Better Before I Knew You So Well, unmaking boundaries, and book titles. ...more

This Week in Essays

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For Huffington Post’s Highline magazine, Jason Fagone profiles a trauma surgeon working to make a small dent in our country’s problem with gun violence.

At Catapult, Abbey Fenbert writes a funny, heartfelt essay about trying to ban books in the seventh grade.

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This Week in Essays

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At Granta, Deepti Kapoor’s observations on traveling the world draw her closer to home.

At The Rumpus, Kaylie Jones writes on the ripple effect mental illness has on a family grappling with a loved one’s struggles.

Danielle Jackson traces her literary heritage and the guideposts who helped her along the way for Lit Hub.

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This Week in Essays

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For Lidia Yuknavitch, the personal is unavoidably political in this piece for Electric Literature.

At Catapult, David Frey writes with moving realness on what it is like to watch a parent age and transition into assisted living.

Jenessa Abrams looks at the nuances of mental illness and the damage of a word like “crazy” here at The Rumpus.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Melissa Febos

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Melissa Febos discusses her new book Abandon Me, choosing to be celibate for six months, letting go of our own mythologies, and the sexist reaction women receive when they write nonfiction. ...more

This Week in Essays

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Minda Honey writes at Longreads on traveling to detox from whiteness and discovering there is nearly nowhere to escape.

Good news, New Yorkers: apparently noise can be good for creativity. Susie Neilson looks at the good and the bad of noise pollution for Nautilus.

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This Week in Essays

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For Electric Literature, Christine Vines ably dissects the TV show Crazy Ex-Girlfriend and finds it wanting, with the notable conclusion that “We still have a problem with the word ‘crazy’ and this show, despite its feminist packaging, is doing nothing to alleviate it.”

Rumpus Advisory Board member Melissa Febos offers essential advice to writers on how to handle the demands on your time over at Catapult.

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