Posts Tagged: Faulkner

Reading Mixtape feature

Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #22: Classic Novels That Are a Joy to Read

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Sometimes we bypass the classic novels on the way to the rich offering of current literary fiction. Fair enough; there is so much to love in today’s fiction. But once in a while, dust off a classic gem and consider the language, the depth, the metaphorical heft these books carry—along with being engrossing, powerful reads.

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Sunil Yapa by Beowulf Sheehan

The Rumpus Interview with Sunil Yapa

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Sunil Yapa discusses his debut novel, Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist, radical empathy, growing up surrounded by politics, and losing the first draft of his novel in Chile. ...more

Our Literary Footpaths

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Over at The Toast, Rebecca Turkewitz writes about the intersections between literary geography and the real, from Joyce’s Dublin and Tolkien’s Middle Europe to Faulkner’s Mississippi and Munro’s Ontario—how we explore these places by walking through pages, and how they map to our homes and street corners.

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Another Lost Work by a Dead Writer

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If it seems that “lost” books, short stories, and everything else are coming out of the woodwork, well, they are. The Strand magazine has just published Twixt Cup and Lip, an early play by William Faulkner written in the 1920s:

The Strand describes the play as “a light-hearted jazz age story.” Prohibition is under way, and the friends are enjoying an illicit drink.

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mazin-the-poet marc chagall

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Old Friends Or Lovers

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I was becoming awed by the wide horizon of the speech that arose out of an individual life lived in a single era and generation. I was becoming attracted to the writer’s creativity. ...more

Thorpe Moeckel

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Thorpe Moeckel

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Thorpe Moeckel about his new book Arcadia Road, the challenge of writing long poems, raising twins, and camo thongs. ...more

Mad Max

Rewrite, Reboot, Remix

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Rewriting the classics has become a stale and risk-averse strategy. But that shouldn’t spoil the fun of our larger culture of remixing. ...more

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The Creative Writing Class That Changed My Life

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One could sense this passion in all of us. It seemed to fill the classroom as if it were part of the oxygen. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Christy Crutchfield

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Novelist Christy Crutchfield talks about her debut, How to Catch a Coyote, world building, inspiration, icky fiction, the role of mystery, and the marathon of novel writing ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Paul Griner

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Paul Griner talks about his newest novel, Second Life, his just-released story collection Hurry Please I Want to Know, putting real life into fiction, and whether creative writing can be taught. ...more

Christmas in the Heart

Swinging Modern Sounds #63: It’s Supposed to Be Bad

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Rick Moody emails with Scott Timberg, author of the new book Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class, about Bob Dylan's new Sinatra covers album, the need for cultural gatekeepers, and the "slippery sub genre" of bad-on-purpose art. ...more

Keeping Faulkner on a Short Leash

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The roguish, hard-drinking novelist is a beloved American archetype, but one the State Department took extra care to control as an international ambassador, according to recently released documents on William Faulkner. Since the author couldn’t be counted on to responsibly manage his own drinking, the US Information Agency put together careful guidelines for a successful trip, including supervision, accommodations, and tricks to keep Faulkner’s attention.

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The Rumpus Interview with Steph Cha

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Steph Cha talks about her new novel, Beware Beware, writing compelling and complex Korean American characters, and what reading a book has in common with a level in a video game. ...more

Things You Never Got to Hear Faulkner Say

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When Faulkner addressed English classes at the University of Mississippi in 1947, he offered some interesting advice (there is always time for writing, it’s not good to wait when feeling inspired, the peak age for fiction writing is 35-45, etc.). Supplementing his literary guidance was some personal history and sharp opinions (he wrote Sanctuary because he needed money, prefers Florida to Hollywood, women and rich people have optimal conditions for getting reading done).

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