Posts Tagged: Faulkner

Ward’s Mississippi Is Our Mississippi: Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

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Capturing the Delta in harrowing detail, Ward takes readers on a journey from her own home of the Gulf Coast to the Mississippi State Penitentiary.

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Wisdom Is a Double-Edged Sword: Talking with Jay Baron Nicorvo

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Jay Baron Nicorvo discusses his debut novel, The Standard Grand, how easy it is for civilians to forget about soldiers and veterans, and his longstanding love of animals.

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Making a Narrative in the Darkness: A Conversation with Samantha Hunt

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Samantha Hunt discusses her new collection, The Dark Dark, why she became a writer, and the freeing quiet of darkness.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jonathan Corcoran

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Jonathan Corcoran discusses his debut collection The Rope Swing, Appalachian writing communities, getting disowned by his family for coming out, and his father’s death.

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Rosanne Cash - Black Cadillac | Rumpus Music

Albums of Our Lives: Rosanne Cash’s Black Cadillac

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In her voice, I am held, cradled even. I am equal parts longing and hope. I am home.

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The Rumpus Interview with Leland Cheuk

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Leland Cheuk discusses his novel The Misadventures of Sulliver Pong, dark humor, cancer, morally corrupt characters, and his mother.

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Jesse Lee Kercheval

The Saturday Rumpus Interview with Jesse Lee Kercheval

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I have learned to put myself, my ego, to one side and truly experience someone else’s poetry.

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A Tale of Two Siblings

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For the New York Times’s Bookends column, Thomas Mallon and Leslie Jamison muse on the books that best capture the intricate and fraught relationships between siblings: That’s what I felt Faulkner intuited about siblings: that there were all sorts of gaps and harms and distances that might befall them, that they might inflict on each other, […]

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Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #22: Classic Novels That Are a Joy to Read

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Sometimes we bypass the classic novels on the way to the rich offering of current literary fiction. Fair enough; there is so much to love in today’s fiction. But once in a while, dust off a classic gem and consider the language, the depth, the metaphorical heft these books carry—along with being engrossing, powerful reads. Reading […]

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Writers and Moral Obligation

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At the New York Times Book Ends column this week, Zoë Heller and Francine Prose discuss whether or not William Faulkner’s famous quote, “The writer’s only responsibility is to his art,” holds up. In other words, Heller asks, does producing great art excuse terrible human behavior? Her conclusion is that no, it doesn’t. Prose seems to […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Sunil Yapa

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Sunil Yapa discusses his debut novel, Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist, radical empathy, growing up surrounded by politics, and losing the first draft of his novel in Chile.

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Our Literary Footpaths

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Over at The Toast, Rebecca Turkewitz writes about the intersections between literary geography and the real, from Joyce’s Dublin and Tolkien’s Middle Europe to Faulkner’s Mississippi and Munro’s Ontario—how we explore these places by walking through pages, and how they map to our homes and street corners.

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Another Lost Work by a Dead Writer

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If it seems that “lost” books, short stories, and everything else are coming out of the woodwork, well, they are. The Strand magazine has just published Twixt Cup and Lip, an early play by William Faulkner written in the 1920s: The Strand describes the play as “a light-hearted jazz age story.” Prohibition is under way, and […]

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Old Friends Or Lovers

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I was becoming awed by the wide horizon of the speech that arose out of an individual life lived in a single era and generation. I was becoming attracted to the writer’s creativity.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Thorpe Moeckel

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Thorpe Moeckel about his new book Arcadia Road, the challenge of writing long poems, raising twins, and camo thongs.

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Understanding Faulkner

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Richard Grant discusses how his time living in Mississippi provided him with a more full understanding of William Faulkner’s language. Despite studying Faulkner at school in England, Grant felt that it wasn’t until he moved that he was able to totally appreciate Faulkner’s work: To sit on the old porch reading Mr. Bill, with a […]

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Rewrite, Reboot, Remix

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Rewriting the classics has become a stale and risk-averse strategy. But that shouldn’t spoil the fun of our larger culture of remixing.

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The Creative Writing Class That Changed My Life

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One could sense this passion in all of us. It seemed to fill the classroom as if it were part of the oxygen.

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The Rumpus Interview with Christy Crutchfield

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Novelist Christy Crutchfield talks about her debut, How to Catch a Coyote, world building, inspiration, icky fiction, the role of mystery, and the marathon of novel writing

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The Rumpus Interview with Paul Griner

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Paul Griner talks about his newest novel, Second Life, his just-released story collection Hurry Please I Want to Know, putting real life into fiction, and whether creative writing can be taught.

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Swinging Modern Sounds #63: It’s Supposed to Be Bad

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Rick Moody emails with Scott Timberg, author of the new book Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class, about Bob Dylan’s new Sinatra covers album, the need for cultural gatekeepers, and the “slippery sub genre” of bad-on-purpose art.

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Keeping Faulkner on a Short Leash

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The roguish, hard-drinking novelist is a beloved American archetype, but one the State Department took extra care to control as an international ambassador, according to recently released documents on William Faulkner. Since the author couldn’t be counted on to responsibly manage his own drinking, the US Information Agency put together careful guidelines for a successful […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Steph Cha

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Steph Cha talks about her new novel, Beware Beware, writing compelling and complex Korean American characters, and what reading a book has in common with a level in a video game.

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Book Club with Grandma

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For The Millions, Bryan Vandyke reflects on his relationship with his grandmother and how works by Nabokov and Faulkner allowed for a connection between generations: Reading is solitary and personal, but you aren’t necessarily alone in it. In some ways, we are all reading together; even if we are also reading alone.  

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Sound and the Fury 2.0

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Is Lila inspired by The Idiot and The Sounds and The Fury? I’m not sure whether Lila is a stand-in for Christ, but it is clear to me that Robinson has written a character, a new kind of idiot, who is as impressive as Prince Myshkin from The Idiot or Benjy from The Sound and […]

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The Loneliest Art

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Does screenwriting qualify as “real” writing? Over at the New Yorker, Richard Brody wonders what F. Scott Fitzgerald’s failed shot at Hollywood reveals about film as an industry and as an art: Fitzgerald was undone by his screenwriting-is-writing mistake. It’s a notion that has its basis in artistic form. Look at Fitzgerald’s books: they are […]

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