Posts Tagged: Girls

Tania James photo credit Melissa Stewart Photography

Visible: Women Writers of Color #2: Tania James

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Tania James discusses her most recent novel, The Tusk That Did the Damage, the challenges of writing an elephant narrator, and the moment when she knew she could be a writer. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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A bookstore owner in Maine has collected a huge payday after a rare stamp sold for close to $60,000.

One of the missing Hong Kong booksellers was a British citizen, and now Britain is saying this citizen was involuntarily removed to the mainland.

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Sheila Levine 250

The Last Book I Loved: Sheila Levine Is Dead and Living In New York

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But when my loneliness feels as vast—and capable of drowning me—as the sea, this book about self-destruction comforts me more than any self-help. ...more

This Week in Posivibes: Will Ivy

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Will Ivy’s first solo 7” came out on Pretty Penny this weekend, with a release show at LA’s HM157. Most recently of Dream Boys, Ivy has played in a number of great SF groups, including Girls and Hunx and His Punx.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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On Tuesday, Margaret Atwood released Stone Mattress, a collection of “wonderfully weird short stories.” Stone Mattress is Atwood’s eighth collection of stories, not to mention her 14 novels and other formidable volumes of poetry, children’s literature, and nonfiction. Reviewers across the boards are heralding this most recent work as “wise, sharp,” and “rich.”

Let’s look at the title story of the collection, published by the New Yorker back in December 2011.

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Honest to a Fault

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You probably knew that Lena Dunham wrote a memoir (if you didn’t, she has), but she’d love to remind you why she’s qualified. Meghan Daum elaborates for the New York Times Magazine:

To suggest that Dunham is too young, too privileged, too entitled, too narcissistic, neurotic and provincial (in that rarefied Manhattan-raised way) to be dispensing advice to anyone is to add very little to the ever-expanding, very much already-in-progress conversation about her place in the culture and her overall right to exist.

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Dear Sugar Sparks A Tiny Revolution

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In the face of rampant negative body image and self-esteem issues, New York City is launching a campaign to help girls declare, “I’m beautiful the way I am.”

Samantha Levine, the Bloomberg aide behind the campaign, cites one of Cheryl Strayed’s Dear Sugar columns as an inspiration:

“I think being a woman in this society, it’s sort of impossible to not be aware of the pressures there are around appearance, around weight, around trying to always look a certain way,” Ms.

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Thoughts on Gender from A “Manic Depressive Nightmare Girl”

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Girls rule, etcetera. But men are not afraid of girls. Girls never did and don’t now “run the world,” and if we believe Bey when she sings so, it’s only because she’s a woman.

For Vice, Sarah Nicole Prickett writes a provocative piece about the value of being a bitch in a world where women often slip into the infantilized, genteel roles of “girl” and “lady.”

Whether you agree with all her points or not, it’s an exhilarating read.

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“The Profundity of Female Friendships”

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At The New Yorker, Anna Holmes writes about how “Girls” and Sheila Heti’s new novel How Should a Person Be? “treat heterosexual coupling as secondary, and how they depict the profundity of female friendships, not to mention their real perils—which are quite different from the competitive jockeying that is so often imagined.”

Holmes proposes that these texts may signify “the beginnings, perhaps, of a revolution in the way women’s relationships are discussed.”

Read Emily Rapp’s wonderful essay on the power of female friendship here.

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