Posts Tagged: hippies

Rumpus Original Fiction: April, 1968

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Used to see lots of psychedelic princes and princesses on Haight Street. Not many these days. But here were hundreds of the turned on and tuned in, dressed like birds and peacocks in heat. ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #5: Vulcan Mind Meld, Anyone?

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Your Storming Bohemian is emphatically a child of the early 70s. At fifteen, I lived in a hippie commune under the guidance of an eccentric psychologist, later diagnosed as bipolar. All I knew is, he was hella fun. Dr. Bill wasn’t the sort to make a fuss about school attendance, regular hours, pot smoking, or style of dress (or undress, for that matter).

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The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #4: Keep the Change

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This week, your Storming Bohemian has moved to a new house. Again. And so some reflections:

There is much to be said for stability, I know. The steady quiet observation of the likes of Annie Dillard or Henry Thoreau evokes my admiration.

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The Commune

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Our house, we believed, was a microcosm of that country. Every month, we’d gather at the kitchen table for our house meeting, where we, like politicians, unveiled our big plans for change. ...more

The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium: Gary Panter

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The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium is a weekly forum for discussing the tradition and future of text/image work. Open to the public, it meets Tuesday nights 7-9 p.m. EST in New York City.

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The Hippie Pack Rat on Display

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A New York Times journalist recently got a sneak-peek at “roughly 170 linear feet of manuscripts, reporter’s notebooks, newspaper clippings, sketches and other materials” that will comprise an upcoming archive of Tom Wolfe’s work at the New York Public Library. Thanks to Wolfe’s pack rat tendencies, the archive will preserve not only his vision but also the way he was (and still is) viewed by others:

Running through his papers, the library’s archivists say, is an unusually rich vein of incoming correspondence showing just how editors, literary agents, research subjects and ordinary readers—to say nothing of his tailors, for whom he sometimes sketched out elaborate instructions—saw him.

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