Posts Tagged: Hobart

This Week in Essays

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At The California Sunday Magazine, Brooke Jarvis has a devastating piece about missing persons and family members lost over the border. For VIDA, Jean Ho shares her discouraging experience at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. And here at The Rumpus, Chellis Ying writes about rock climbing in China, which turned out to be an opportunity for both thrills […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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What would you give to be happy, fun, anxiety-free? Would you give your soul? This is the question Deirdre Coyle asks in her story “Fun Person,” up at Hobart this week. The story opens with the narrator vomiting on the sidewalk outside of a bar, but not for the obvious reasons one might vomit in […]

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Talking Pity

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After I wrote Pity, I assumed only women would read it and men would mock even the idea of it. I think this lazy premonition was a result of receiving feedback years prior from a male editor that told me my first chapbook was immature and superfluous, simply because it was about female friendship. Over […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week brings us two stories in translation. First, “Six Days in Glorious Vienna,” at Hobart, is a quiet story with a punch. By Japanese author Yoko Ogawa and translated by Stephen Snyder, the story is part of the anthology A Kind of Compass: Stories on Distance, released on Thursday by Irish publisher Tramp Press. […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Think of the most complicated and intriguing people you have ever met. Think of the way it feels to return to those people again and again, each time finding some new facet of truth, beauty, insight, originality. Michael Cunningham’s “White Angel” is a story like one of those people.  First published in the New Yorker […]

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“What I Remember”

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Rumpus contributor Ray Shea has a new essay over at Hobart. It is a beautiful essay on anger, self control, and body issues. Take a peek: I want to say that I shrunk into my shoes and disappeared, but when somebody throws “fat guy” at you, you don’t shrink, you grow. You bloat. Your belly […]

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The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

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“I feel that for writers, an obsession with what is elegant or what is a cliché or not a cliché can become very inhibiting.” Booker Prize winner Kazuo Ishiguro stands up for cliches. (via Bookninja) “Laughs were out, torture porn was in.” Colin Bateman wonders what happened to humor in crime fiction. GIANT wants to […]

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