Posts Tagged: huffington post

The Purpose of Punctuation

By

Artist Nicholas Rougeux focuses on the punctuation of famous works by removing all of the letters in a text and arranging the punctuation in a spiral around a central image. Rougeux speaks on the purpose of his work:

Rougeux doesn’t have any bold claims for what his graphics reveal about literature, writing, “I’m not sure anything revolutionary is revealed.” But in the absence of what we most often focus on—the words—we’re able to see how different authors put punctuation to work in telling their stories, and how even such simple marks might ebb and flow over the course of a single narrative.

...more

In Defense of Memoir

By

If you don’t like memoir, don’t read it. And certainly don’t write about it. So you might be a critically acclaimed novelist, but if you don’t understand the genre, your critique is like Vin Scully smacking down golf, or Bob Dylan slamming rap.

...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

By

A huge new bookstore in the heart of Mexico’s drug cartel region hopes to combat ‘narco culture’ by offering an alternative, including classes for children and adults.

Innisfree Poetry Bookstore in Boulder, Colorado has plans to move to a larger location.

...more

Unique Pageviews Don’t Pay Your Web Hosting Bill

By

Wil Wheaton created quite a fuss last month with an essay about Huffington Post’s request to republish an essay from his blog sans payment. When we called attention to a Salon article discussing paid versus unpaid creative work, Gawker had a “got you” moment, pointing out that The Rumpus doesn’t pay its writers.

...more

Exposure Doesn’t Pay Your Rent

By

Last week, author and Star Trek actor Wil Wheaton wrote an essay about the seven things he did to reboot his life. The Huffington Post, a publisher recently purchased by Verizon Communications for $4.4 billion, offered Wheaton the opportunity to republish the essay in exchange for the “unique platform and reach our site provides.” Wheaton declined.

...more

Diaz Urges Readers to Diversify

By

For the Huffington Post, Carolina Moreno discusses Junot Diaz’s recent appearance on Late Night with Seth Meyers, where the award-winning author stressed the importance of reading authors from diverse backgrounds:

You look at this country and you look at this world and you need to understand it in complex ways… And part of that complexity is, of course, questions of gender: If you don’t want to deal and relate and think about what it means to be a woman in this planet— you’re going to have serious problems.

...more

Happy Banned Books Week!

By

The point is not to rank inflammatory books like game highlights. It’s to remind readers that information hasn’t always been free, and that we have librarians to thank for its freedom.

Huffington Post’s Maddie Crum explores why we celebrate Banned Books Week in America, and takes a look at freedom of information and the librarians who make it possible.

...more

Sneaking into Book Clubs in High-End Neighborhoods

By

Is it bad that I joined a book club to weasel my way into the fancy homes on the other side of my cul-de-sac? With no intention of reading the books?

At the Huffington Post, Jennifer Boyd-Einstein and Paula Mangin tell the story of joining a book club in a neighborhood that (technically) wasn’t their own and their “oddly addicting” curiosities about the houses’ décor.

...more

A World Without Libraries

By

Libraries are under threat, and those that want to survive will need to modernize. But what does the world look like if libraries change too much, or cease to exist at all? Over at Huffington Post, Lindsey Drager examines what a future without books might look like by defining what libraries do:

What concerns me about this shift in the ontological status of library-hood is what might be lost in transition.

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Leave it to The Toast to give us a story told by a mermaid as opposed to a story about one. And leave it to The Toast to find a very good mermaid storyteller indeed. On Wednesday, they released “Mermaids at the End of the Universe: A Short Story” by Kendra Fortmeyer, featuring illustrations by Stephanie Monohan.

...more

Dear Diary

By

…while autobiography and memoir have gained ground as legitimate and canonical literary modes, the diary retains an association with inappropriate, overly personal, or pejoratively “private” discourse.

At Huffington Post, Kylie Cardell examines the diary’s transition into public art form, from tabloid scoops and confessional blogs to contemporary figures who publish their own diaries, and our cultural obsession with the intimate form.

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Playing off of Jerry Seinfeld’s video series, “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” The Morning News introduced a new column earlier this month called “Novelists in Restaurants Eating Food.” Roxane Gay offered up the first samplingand this Wednesday, Jami Attenburg contributed the second, “Café de la Esquina.” Should there be doubts as to the genre of the review/not review, the editors left a hashtag-fiction indicator at the bottom for us.

...more

Frankenstein, The Tree with Forty Fruit

By

Miraculous, and not a flaming sword near it—Sam Van Aken’s project marries sculpture and agriculture and genetics and a little bit of wonder.

I was able to see the grafting process while growing up on a farm and have always been fascinated by how one living thing cut could be cut inserted into another living thing and continue to grow,” Van Aken explained to HuffPost.

...more

Little Book Amok

By

As authority disseminates across webs of increasingly smaller presses and publications, it becomes harder and harder for new authors to see their books on bookstore shelves, especially those of larger stores like Barnes & Noble’s.

Unless, of course, they put the books there themselves:

They haven’t yet asked me to stop desecrating their shelves with my book, or notice, for that matter.

...more

Rumpus Round-Up: All the Abramson News Fit to Print

By

Jill Abramson, the first woman to head the New York Times as executive editor, was abruptly fired Wednesday and replaced by managing editor Dean Baquet.

The New Yorker attempted to explain why, with the leading theory being Abramson’s discovery several weeks ago that she earned less than her male predecessor.

...more

Discussion Nostalgia, Book Clubbing

By

Up on your wall behind your office desk is a small sheet of paper, gold-leaf embossed, an emblem in the bottom right hand corner—it reads: The University of Something-or-Rather in authoritative print. But is the paper just filling space? You miss the seminars, the depth, the charged discussions…

Have a look at this article from the Huffington Post for some information on how to have a successful book club.

...more