Posts Tagged: huffington post

George Gets Curious about Ramadan

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Children’s literature’s most beloved rambunctious primate, Curious George, has a new installment in his adventures, and this time he’s curious about a holiday most Americans remain clueless about: the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. The Huffington Post reflects on the timeliness of It’s Ramadan, Curious George in light of increasing Islamophobia in American culture.

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Podcatcher #2: Rose Buddies

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Rachel and Griffin McElroy, hosts of The Bachelor fancast Rose Buddies, talk about about the problematic aspects of the show, how they stay hydrated, and what’s up with all those McElroy podcasts. ...more

Crushes on Fiction

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Contributors over at Huffington Post discuss five fictional characters that stimulated their pre-teen/teen sexual awakening, including Artemis from Artemis Fowl and Gilbert Blythe from Anne of Green Gables:

When it comes to my sexual awakening in fiction, specific characters figure very little.

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Lemon-Drizzled Cakes Bring J.K. Rowling to Your Book Club

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There are no shortages of serendipitous tales of celebrities meeting up with their average-Joe fans through something as small as a Twitter exchange. For one library in Scotland, an exchange of teasing Twitter messages led to J.K. Rowling making an actual appearance for a book club covering her book The Cuckoo’s Calling (written under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith).

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How to Hack Your Way to Being a “Best Selling” Book on Amazon

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Because of the high bar, the term “bestselling author” was [once] a term with some meaning. It was seen as something that was earned through a lot of hard work. But today, that designation has changed—for the worse. It’s like when you see a food described as “natural.” The FDA doesn’t actually regulate that term, so it’s basically meaningless.

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Writing with Your Fears

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It is easy to forget that fear isn’t a thing—it’s just a feeling to which we have attached a word. It’s a powerful feeling, however, It is so powerful that if I sit in my living room and imagine a killer is waiting for me outside my door, and if I begin to believe what I am imagining, I will feel the alarm bells of panic within me as if I could actually see the killer’s shadow in my window.

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The Purpose of Punctuation

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Artist Nicholas Rougeux focuses on the punctuation of famous works by removing all of the letters in a text and arranging the punctuation in a spiral around a central image. Rougeux speaks on the purpose of his work:

Rougeux doesn’t have any bold claims for what his graphics reveal about literature, writing, “I’m not sure anything revolutionary is revealed.” But in the absence of what we most often focus on—the words—we’re able to see how different authors put punctuation to work in telling their stories, and how even such simple marks might ebb and flow over the course of a single narrative.

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In Defense of Memoir

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If you don’t like memoir, don’t read it. And certainly don’t write about it. So you might be a critically acclaimed novelist, but if you don’t understand the genre, your critique is like Vin Scully smacking down golf, or Bob Dylan slamming rap.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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A huge new bookstore in the heart of Mexico’s drug cartel region hopes to combat ‘narco culture’ by offering an alternative, including classes for children and adults.

Innisfree Poetry Bookstore in Boulder, Colorado has plans to move to a larger location.

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Unique Pageviews Don’t Pay Your Web Hosting Bill

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Wil Wheaton created quite a fuss last month with an essay about Huffington Post’s request to republish an essay from his blog sans payment. When we called attention to a Salon article discussing paid versus unpaid creative work, Gawker had a “got you” moment, pointing out that The Rumpus doesn’t pay its writers.

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Exposure Doesn’t Pay Your Rent

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Last week, author and Star Trek actor Wil Wheaton wrote an essay about the seven things he did to reboot his life. The Huffington Post, a publisher recently purchased by Verizon Communications for $4.4 billion, offered Wheaton the opportunity to republish the essay in exchange for the “unique platform and reach our site provides.” Wheaton declined.

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Diaz Urges Readers to Diversify

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For the Huffington Post, Carolina Moreno discusses Junot Diaz’s recent appearance on Late Night with Seth Meyers, where the award-winning author stressed the importance of reading authors from diverse backgrounds:

You look at this country and you look at this world and you need to understand it in complex ways… And part of that complexity is, of course, questions of gender: If you don’t want to deal and relate and think about what it means to be a woman in this planet— you’re going to have serious problems.

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Happy Banned Books Week!

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The point is not to rank inflammatory books like game highlights. It’s to remind readers that information hasn’t always been free, and that we have librarians to thank for its freedom.

Huffington Post’s Maddie Crum explores why we celebrate Banned Books Week in America, and takes a look at freedom of information and the librarians who make it possible.

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Sneaking into Book Clubs in High-End Neighborhoods

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Is it bad that I joined a book club to weasel my way into the fancy homes on the other side of my cul-de-sac? With no intention of reading the books?

At the Huffington Post, Jennifer Boyd-Einstein and Paula Mangin tell the story of joining a book club in a neighborhood that (technically) wasn’t their own and their “oddly addicting” curiosities about the houses’ décor.

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A World Without Libraries

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Libraries are under threat, and those that want to survive will need to modernize. But what does the world look like if libraries change too much, or cease to exist at all? Over at Huffington Post, Lindsey Drager examines what a future without books might look like by defining what libraries do:

What concerns me about this shift in the ontological status of library-hood is what might be lost in transition.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Leave it to The Toast to give us a story told by a mermaid as opposed to a story about one. And leave it to The Toast to find a very good mermaid storyteller indeed. On Wednesday, they released “Mermaids at the End of the Universe: A Short Story” by Kendra Fortmeyer, featuring illustrations by Stephanie Monohan.

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Dear Diary

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…while autobiography and memoir have gained ground as legitimate and canonical literary modes, the diary retains an association with inappropriate, overly personal, or pejoratively “private” discourse.

At Huffington Post, Kylie Cardell examines the diary’s transition into public art form, from tabloid scoops and confessional blogs to contemporary figures who publish their own diaries, and our cultural obsession with the intimate form.

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