Posts Tagged: illness

Charles Bock © Nina Subin

The Rumpus Interview with Charles Bock

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Charles Bock discusses his new novel, Alice & Oliver, the challenges of writing from experience, and how art and life can mirror one another. ...more

Kristopher Jansma Photo credit Michael Levy

The Rumpus Interview with Kristopher Jansma

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Kristopher Jansma discusses his second novel, Why We Came to the City, facing adulthood in his thirties, and working through grief and loss in writing. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Sandra and Ben Doller

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Sandra and Ben Doller talk about The Yesterday Project, a blind collaboration, and about what it means to savor each day when you have stage III melanoma. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Thunder, Thighs

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Over one third of the women in my survey had been called “Thunder Thighs” at some point in their life. Many were still haunted by this. None of them interpreted “thunder” to mean “power. ...more

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Super Hot Prof-on-Student Word Sex #14: Julia MacDonnell

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Julia was one of those “students” whom you suspect, after maybe fifteen seconds, should actually be teaching the class you are currently (allegedly) teaching. ...more

Treatment as Metaphor

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In our daily efforts to stay healthy, to invent solutions for staving off death, have we already put ourselves in treatment for diseases yet to come? Conner Habib writes about his cancer diagnosis over at The Stranger, challenging Susan Sontag’s argument against seeing illness as a metaphor by revealing the ways in which we can’t help but give it meaning:

We reach out to the hand that promises to pull us to shore.

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Women Dying from Being Women

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Anne Boyer writes about the history of breast cancer for The New Inquiry.

There is no disease more calamitous to women’s intellectual history than breast cancer: this is because there is no disease more distinctly calamitous to women. There is also no disease more voluminous in its agonies, agonies not only about the disease itself, but also about what is not written about it, or whether to write about it, or how.

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