Posts Tagged: immigration

lelandcheuk300x300

The Rumpus Interview with Leland Cheuk

By

Leland Cheuk discusses his novel The Misadventures of Sulliver Pong, dark humor, cancer, morally corrupt characters, and his mother. ...more

A Convergence of Selves

By

In an illuminating interview with Claire Schwartz for Guernica, writer Kai Cheng Thom discusses activism, the unique intersections felt by people of color in the queer community, consensual behavior, trauma, and the immigrant experience. It’s a lot of ground to cover, and in doing so she reveals the convergence of all these areas of concern into a singular identity she’s had to construct for herself:

When you begin to define yourself as a queer person of color (qpoc) and transgender or transsexual and of color, you have to, in a sense, give birth to that.

...more

Voting_machine feature

Choosing Stories: On Partisanship, the Media, & American Ideology in 2016

By

What kind of change do I want, and what does fighting for it look like, today? ...more

Letters Laura feature

Letters to Laura from a McDonald’s in Brooklyn

By

Tonight my loneliness is infinite and I could eat dinner or dance with my limbs wild because there is no gravity keeping me grounded. ...more

JanineJoseph

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Janine Joseph

By

The day the manuscript became Driving without a License was the day I said “yes” to the truth of my own life and coming-of-age experience as an undocumented immigrant. ...more

SnackMixMagenDavid

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Used to Be Schwartz

By

When I told my friend Aharon that my family name used to be Schwartz, he said, “Used to be Schwartz—sounds like a Borscht Belt act.” ...more

What Country… Should Give You Harbour?

By

Allison Meier writes at Hyperallergic on a speech, recently digitized by the British Library, that proves to be the only example of Shakespeare’s handwriting other than a few signatures. The excerpt comes from Sir Thomas More, a play written in collaboration, wherein the title character asks for sympathy for migrants, driven from their homes and countries.

...more

Writing from the Margins into the Universal

By

Sahota takes it further in “The Year of the Runaways”: “What decadence this belonging rubbish was, what time the rich must have if they could sit around and weave great worries out of such threadbare things.”

With an eye on two new novels by Indian writers, and perspective from writers such as Salman Rushdie, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Pankaj Mishra, Parul Sehgal of the New York Times Book Review writes about the state of the literature of immigration.

...more

Poet Kathleen Spivack

The Rumpus Interview with Kathleen Spivack

By

Poet Kathleen Spivack discusses releasing her debut novel Unspeakable Things at age seventy-seven. ...more

plankton feature

Plankton (A Body of Stars)

By

Plankton either grows into something other than plankton—a strong swimming non-planktonic adult, like a crab or a fish, or it stays the same—forever drifting with the shifting tides. ...more

Chaitali Sen feature

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Chaitali Sen

By

Swati Khurana talks to the author of The Pathless Sky, a love story centered around place, the state’s authority, statelessness, and geology. ...more

lobster

The Rumpus Interview with Zarina Zabrisky

By

Zarina Zabrisky talks about her new book, Explosion, the art of the short story, Russia and Ukraine, and being "a Jewish pessimist in the spirit of Shalom Aleichem." ...more

Goldman

The Rumpus Interview with Francisco Goldman

By

Francisco Goldman talks about the Narvarte Murders, Ayotzinapa, and the stories he feels most responsible for telling now. ...more

Davis, Joshua - (c) Sebastian Mlynarski

The Rumpus Interview with Joshua Davis

By

Joshua Davis talks about his new book, Spare Parts (now a movie playing all across the United States), backwards running, journalism, and entering the US National Arm Wrestling Championship. ...more

Temporary Residence

By

At NYT Magazine, Maggie Jones profiles an entire generation: the South Korean adoptees making the trek back “home.” But having spent their lives abroad, where “home” is becomes a tough question to answer:

As Trenka writes in her memoir, “The Language of Blood”: “How can I weigh the loss of my language and culture against the freedom that America has to offer, the opportunity to have the same rights as a man?

...more

Teju Cole Tweets 4,000-Word Essay

By

Last week Teju Cole published a 4,000-word non-fiction essay on immigration, titled “A Piece of the Wall,” entirely on Twitter. BuzzFeed spoke with Cole about his decision to share the piece via the social media platform, the challenges in doing so, and his views on immigration reform:

I’m not getting my hopes up, but the point of writing about these things, and hoping they reach a big audience, has nothing to do with “innovation” or with “writing.” It’s about the hope that more and more people will have their conscience moved about the plight of other human beings.

...more

“I Am an Alien”

By

Moving to the US as a person of color isn’t easy, even when you do everything completely above-board, come from a nation friendly with the US, and arrive with a respectable family in tow.

Toni Nealie discusses her experience coming to America from New Zealand in an essay for Guernica:

My iris is captured in a biometrics file with the U.S Immigration Service….My deep brown eyes, the eyes that have held the gaze of my beloved, the eyes that look like my mother’s, that my newborn sons searched for and struggled to focus on: these are now U.S territory.

...more

Pioneer Women

By

My own mother bought our clothes at the mall. She didn’t allow pork in the house and mostly cooked curry. The saris she wore didn’t require needlework.

Growing up in Wyoming, Nina McConigley longed for an authentic pioneer life like she read about in the Little House on the Prairie books—and resented her mother, an immigrant from India, for not teaching her how to quilt or even bake cookies.

...more

“All Your Life is a Work of Art”

By

The Atlantic has been hosting a series called “By Heart,” where authors discuss their favorite quotes in literature.

Edwidge Dandicat talks about her immigration experience and chooses a passage from a novel by Patricia Engels, which articulates that “trying to start a life in a strange land is an artistic feat of the highest order, one that ranks with (or perhaps above) our greatest cultural achievements.”

Dandicat says, “This brings art into the realm of what ordinary people do to in order to survive.

...more

“I Am One of Them”

By

Crossing Over, a documentary by director Isabel Castro, follows three transgender women—all of them undocumented Mexican immigrants—as they seek asylum in the US.

“Although this started as a project to raise awareness about the complexities of immigration,” Castro told Buzzfeed, “it has grown into one that is trying to raise awareness about transphobia (both in Latin American cultures and in the United States.)”

For more details, including a beautiful trailer, check out the film’s website.

...more