Quantcast

Posts Tagged: Internet

It’s All Context

By

The Internet offers us near-limitless amounts of information, often for free, at the touch of our fingertips. But it’s also a tool, and like all tools, is subject to the ways in which it is (or isn’t) put to use. Rumpus interviewee Maria Konnikova considers how the lack of contextualization of Internet information shapes the way that information might be used, in writing and otherwise:

When we strip away context, we strip away everything that enables us to determine what something really means.

...more

How Toxic Is Online Feminism?

By

There’s a heated conversation about online feminism happening—where else?—online right now.

Ignited by a piece in the Nation about Internet toxicity as well as an ill-advised xoJane piece about white privilege in yoga class, the discussion is focusing on intersectionality in feminism, particularly as it regards race.

...more

Taking a Break from the Internet

By

We at the Rumpus love the Internet. We are, after all, a place to read, on the Internet (just check our Twitter bio).

But sometimes it’s good to contemplate how exactly you’re using the Internet and why, as Matthew Gallaway does in this piece for the Awl:

I had gradually become incapacitated by the endless sales pitch of my online persona, the implicit dissonance as I compared it to my offline self, the constant cycle of posturing and affirmation.

...more

On Being A “Vile, Loathsome, Despicable Pig”

By

Via Verge‘s best-of-2012 list, here’s an essay by Meghan Daum about the lakes of vitriol that make up so many online comments sections.

She compares the unfavorable reaction to a somewhat naïve piece she wrote about safe sex in the ’90s to the daily attacks she now receives on her “looks, marital or reproductive status, and standing on the bitch-o-meter”—and then considers the verbal skirmishes of the Founding Fathers.

...more

A Internet-Based Literary Performance Piece

By

Do you know about the Precession?

Judd Morrissey and Mark Jeffrey’s project is pioneering new digital landscape, making the act of writing into a visually-stimulating performance piece, combined with the personal act of reading work on the Internet. It is a collaborative performance piece, a social commentary and ready for you to experience at any time.

...more

Revolutionary Wikipedia

By

All of us Wikipedia users are constantly reaping the benefits of massive information-based collaboration. This essay, published in the Awl, considers why this resource is so essential in our digital age. Anybody who has ever accidently cited Wikipedia on a college paper as a freshman can now liberate themselves from the shame–Wikipedia is deconstructing the personal ownership of ideas, transforming our material world and creating a new unity.

...more

Real Life Honesty

By

“‘One of the most important reasons to write, to make art, to make music, to be an artist of any sort, is to connect. To show others, ‘I too have felt this way, share it with me.’ If you try and connect with anyone in a way that is not earnest, it isn’t a connection.

...more

Digital Folk Art

By

“Like quilting, archiving employs the obsessive stitching together of many small pieces into a larger vision, a personal attempt at ordering a chaotic world.”

This essay provides some edgy perspective on archiving, folk art and collectors as artists. Also, how the internet has intertwined the act of archiving and creating.

...more

Should We All Commit Facebook Suicide?

By

“But somewhere in that transition from a social site meant to deepen interpersonal relationships to a self promotional, commercial tool, Facebook lost its appeal.

“The various facets of my life merged into a web of connectivity where I could no longer clearly create distinct relationships with friends, foes, and fast food — either because I can’t figure out how or because Facebook is preventing me outright.

...more

Ceasefire Liberia And The Promise of the Internet

By

Going through the book blogs every week, I read a lot  about how the Internet is ruining everything — from publishing to our attention spans to investigative journalism to our social lives. But every once in a while, I hear about an online project that’s so necessary and does so much good that I flash back to what it was like when all this technology was brand new and we thought it would turn the world into some sort of tech-happy utopia.

...more

The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

By

It’s summertime. BookExpo is in the past. Writers have taken a little break from accosting critics. The book blogs finally have some free time.

And like most people, they are spending that time poking around the Internet and finding lots of things that are a little bit brilliant, from a homeless book club to a web site that asks gifted authors to write on slightly ridiculous objects to something called “possibilianism.” That, plus a “failed interview with Marilyn French,” giving up on vampires, and Middlesex on TV, all below the fold.

...more

Harvard Study ‘Punctures Twitter Hype’

By

That’s the claim of a BBC News article which quotes the study’s lead researcher, Bill Heil, as follows: “Twitter is a broadcast medium rather than an intimate conversation with friends,” and “it looks like a few people are creating content for a few people to read and share.” That’s no great surprise, but there are a couple interesting items in the data.

...more

Jay Smooth on “The Big Moment”

By

Jay Smooth is the founder of WBAI’s Underground Railroad, New York’s longest running hip-hop radio show.  Like nearly all other bipeds, he has a blog. What differentiates Smooth from the pack is that his video posts on ill doctrine are amusing and articulate, blending intellectual commentary and blistering spoken word.  Even for those completely removed from hip-hop culture, Jay Smooth is likeable and relevant, almost like an upgrade of D.L.

...more