Posts Tagged: Internet

Telling Digital Stories in the Classroom

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A communications law professor offers this tale of integrating digital storytelling in the classroom:

After all, we tell our students in courses focusing on skills that online tools are excellent opportunities to engage in some fantastic storytelling. Why not encourage students to use those tools to tell the stories of communication history, theory, sociology or, yes, law?

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An Army of Readers

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The more tools that we get for communication and collaboration, the more we’re taking reading and writing — these really solitary pursuits — and building communities around them for connection and conversation.

Rachel Fershleiser gives a smashing TED Talk about John Green, non-profit budgets, and how the Internet has given shape to a community of readers and writers.

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The Literary Novel is Dead! Long Live the Literary Novel!

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It happens every now and then that we find someone toasting (or mourning) the death of the novel—this time, it’s Will Self’s turn.

“How do you think it feels to have dedicated your entire adult life to an art form only to see the bloody thing dying before your eyes?” At the Guardian, the British writer answers his own question with the transcript of his Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture.

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You Are Invisible

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Writing in the New Yorker about the smartphone app Cloak, Mark O’Connell offers a thoroughly beautiful and poetic commentary on the ontology of visibility:

By generating a kind of omnipresence—whereby we are always available, visible, contactable, all of us there all the time—the technologies that mediate our lives also cause us to disappear, to vanish into a fixed position on the timeline or the news feed.

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It’s All Context

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The Internet offers us near-limitless amounts of information, often for free, at the touch of our fingertips. But it’s also a tool, and like all tools, is subject to the ways in which it is (or isn’t) put to use. Rumpus interviewee Maria Konnikova considers how the lack of contextualization of Internet information shapes the way that information might be used, in writing and otherwise:

When we strip away context, we strip away everything that enables us to determine what something really means.

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How Toxic Is Online Feminism?

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There’s a heated conversation about online feminism happening—where else?—online right now.

Ignited by a piece in the Nation about Internet toxicity as well as an ill-advised xoJane piece about white privilege in yoga class, the discussion is focusing on intersectionality in feminism, particularly as it regards race.

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Taking a Break from the Internet

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We at the Rumpus love the Internet. We are, after all, a place to read, on the Internet (just check our Twitter bio).

But sometimes it’s good to contemplate how exactly you’re using the Internet and why, as Matthew Gallaway does in this piece for the Awl:

I had gradually become incapacitated by the endless sales pitch of my online persona, the implicit dissonance as I compared it to my offline self, the constant cycle of posturing and affirmation.

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On Being A “Vile, Loathsome, Despicable Pig”

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Via Verge‘s best-of-2012 list, here’s an essay by Meghan Daum about the lakes of vitriol that make up so many online comments sections.

She compares the unfavorable reaction to a somewhat naïve piece she wrote about safe sex in the ’90s to the daily attacks she now receives on her “looks, marital or reproductive status, and standing on the bitch-o-meter”—and then considers the verbal skirmishes of the Founding Fathers.

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