Posts Tagged: Iran

Spaces of Exception vs. Spaces of Redemption: The Films of Ana Lily Amirpour

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Diasporic communities live inside a host nation, but they also live with difference. ...more

TORCH: An Alien, Ineligible for Participation

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That a bumbling demagogue would be able to take this institutional racism and weaponize it is, then, not really a surprise. The seeds for this hate were planted a long time ago. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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A massive bookstore, The Book Garden, has opened in Iran’s capital city, Tehran.

The Huffington Post takes a look back at the Strand’s ninety years of successful bookselling in New York City.

A Russian bookstore is helping customers learn Chinese.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Heirlooms

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The strings of our DNA mark us as one, but it’s the roots of our memories that bind us. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Solmaz Sharif

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Solmaz Sharif discusses her new collection Look, the difference between nearness and similarity, and the level of ownership we have over stories. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Jensen Beach

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Jensen Beach about his short story collection Swallowed by the Cold, suburbia in Sweden, quiet racism, and writing a series of connected short stories. ...more

American Ambiguity

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My racial awareness, perhaps even my awareness of myself as a person, self-consciousness, is a three-pronged paradox of shame, pride, and indifference. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Meline Toumani

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Meline Toumani discusses her debut, There Was and There Was Not, the rewards and risks of writing a political memoir, and what it means to approach a divided past and future. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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A Paris bookseller writes about the terror attacks. Parisians, meanwhile, are responding to the terror attacks by buying up all the copies of Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast.

Iranian bookstores opened early on Thursday last week in a campaign to encourage reading in the country.

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Iran Calls Rushdie Speech at Frankfurt “Anti-Cultural”

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This has been organised by the Frankfurt book fair and crosses one of our political system’s red lines. We consider this move as anti-cultural,” [Seyed Abbas Salehi, deputy minister for culture and Islamic guidance] said, according to local news agencies. “Imam Khomeini’s fatwa on this issue is reflective of our religion and it will never fade away.

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Fresh Comics #1: An Iranian Metamorphosis

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The question that lingers even after reading the book is about the use of symbolism in the cartoon and who has the final say—the creator or the readers? ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Gina Nahai

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Gina Nahai talks about her fifth novel, The Luminous Heart of Jonah S., Iran and Los Angeles, and the possibility of a long-sought-after peace in the Middle East. ...more

ISIS: A Rumpus Roundup

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The Islamic State of Iraq in Syria, known better as ISIS, has operated in Syria and Iraq since 2003 as an offshoot of al-Qaeda—at least until al-Qaeda disavowed any connection. The military organization is neither a political party nor religious group, though membership primarily consists of Sunni Muslims, the “orthodox” branch of Islam and the religion’s largest sect (Baghdad’s government contains mostly Shiite Muslims).

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The Rumpus Interview with Porochista Khakpour

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Writer Porochista Khakpour discusses her new novel, The Last Illusion, her desire to literalize the surreal, the role addiction plays for her characters and narrative, and being a lover of outsider stories. ...more

Iran’s Epic Poem, Now with Illustrations

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You’ve heard of the Ramayana and the Epic of Gilgamesh, but have you heard of Shahnameh? It’s Iran’s epic mythical poem, and it’s “twice the length of The Iliad and The Odyssey combined.”

Artist Hamid Rahmanian wanted to bring the seminal Iranian saga, full of romance, war, and intrigue, to an American audience so he sat down and illustrated it—all 600 pages.

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Returning to the Land

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This summer, I found myself in Iran in the midst of an escalating international conflict, admittedly not the most pragmatic of decisions. After a four-hour drive from the Imam Khomeini airport in Tehran, I arrive at my grandmother’s house on the Caspian Sea.

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The Colonel by Mahmoud Dowlatabadi

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Somewhere in an anonymous functionary’s desk drawer or a filing cabinet in a fluorescent-lit office or a cardboard box in a dusty basement sits the Persian-language manuscript of Mahmoud Dowlatabadi’s The Colonel. Whatever the Iranian government does with books that challenge the official history, that so incisively delineate the many facets of Iranian politics and culture and so tragically describe the many places where those divergent forces meet and attempt to destroy each other, whatever the government does with those sorts of books does not include allowing their publication in Iran.

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White Torture

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“After I recanted my false confession, my main interrogator essentially told me he knew I was not a spy. My captors may have wanted to use my false confession to intimidate Iranians advocating better relations with the West. They may have also wanted my false confession to reinforce their claim that America had planted spies throughout Iran.”

The Millions talks with Roxana Saberi, author of Between Two Worlds: My Life and Captivity in Iran, about her time in Evin prison, the Green Movement, and her transformation into a spokeswoman for human rights.

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