Posts Tagged: Joan Didion

Slouching Toward Didion

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The Daily Beast takes a look at the history of the female essayist from Didion to Dunham:

From cultural critic Susan Sontag and journalist-turned-screenwriter-turned-novelist (and Dunham’s mentor) Nora Ephron, and on through to the host of talented female essayists writing today, this is clearly a flourishing genre that the following women writers—in my mind some of the best writing today—are very much making their own; as Carol Hanisch famously declared in 1969, the personal is political; if, that is, one’s personal experience is mined eloquently and intelligently enough.

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A Multimedia Dig

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In their first joint project, The Los Angeles Review of Books and Los Angeles Magazine recently released what they call a “multimedia collaborative story,” Geoff Nicholas Maps a Territory. The piece supplements the release of Nicholson’s new novel, The City Under the Skin, and it documents—in print, video, and photographs—a walk taken by the author and his friend, critic Anthony Miller, “to explore a series of urban ruins” allegedly “hidden in plain sight,” all the way from the Hollywood Walk of Fame to Joan Didion’s old residence.

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Literary Puns, Halloween-Style

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If you like Timothy Leo Taranto’s literary puns here on the Rumpus, you’ll also enjoy these Halloween-themed literary puns over at Vol. 1 Brooklyn.

Written and illustrated by Rumpus contributor Lincoln Michel, they turn your favorite authors into scary monsters, including Louise Eldritch and Sheila Yeti (author, it goes without saying, of How Should A Cryptid Be?

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Joan Didion On Blue Nights

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“What she has written instead is a kind of biography of Joan Didion, and an elusive one at that. Like her novels, it’s more a work of accumulation than of argument, at the end of which Quintana the grown-up remains the enigma Didion must want her to be, while Didion is the woman revealed.

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Didion and Diagnoses

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“Diagnosis never seems to lead to a cure, Didion observes, only an enforced debility. But as with a psychiatric evaluation of herself conducted in 1968 […] Didion sees and reflects on the truths of the assessment even as she ponders it at arm’s length.”

Joan Didion’s forthcoming memoir, Blue Nights, explores the flexibility and arbitrary aspects of  psychiatric diagnoses through the experience of her daughter’s struggle with an evolving diagnosis.

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Literary Fashionables: The Junky and The New Journalist

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Today’s two Literary Fashionables traveled in distinct social settings at the time of their rise to literary fame. One moved with exiles, hustlers and runaways in Paris, Mexico and Tangier and wrote experimental fiction. The other moved to Vogue out of college, got married and would soon join a group of rising journalists, including Tom Wolfe and Hunter S.

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