Posts Tagged: Joy Williams

Short Revolution

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Great novels also experiment and innovate, but a short story can make a never-before-seen formal leap and then peace out, before you’re even sure what’s happened.

At Electric Literature, Rebecca Schiff introduces us to the authors who have revolutionized the short story in recent years.

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Disquiet at the Finish Line

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The idea of art-making as a refuge from reality has become a cliché. But a cliché often becomes a cliché through the repeated force of being true.

Jonathan Lee, author of High Dive, writes about the sense of disquiet experienced upon the realization that the book he wrote, has completed, is physically bound, is actually finished, and what Fernando Pessoa and Joy Williams have to say about that lack of comfort.

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Paul Lisicky

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Paul Lisicky

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The Rumpus Book Club talks with Paul Lisicky about his new book The Narrow Door>/em>, how much of your story you own, and the importance of reading your own work aloud. ...more

Publicicity image of Lincoln Michel.

The Rumpus Interview with Lincoln Michel

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Lincoln Michel talks about his debut short story collection, Upright Beasts, his interest in monsters, and what sources of culture outside of literature inspire him. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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After ten long years without a new story collection from Joy Williams, we are finally rewarded this week with The Visiting Privilege, containing thirteen new stories and thirty-three stories collected from across Williams’s career. Williams is a writer’s writer, a storysmith of the highest caliber whose creations are studied and beloved by the greatest in her field.

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Nelson, Maggie (Harry Dodge)

The Rumpus Interview with Maggie Nelson

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Author Maggie Nelson talks about matrophobia, “sodomitical maternity,” breaking down categories between genres of writing, and her new book, The Argonauts. ...more

The Last Book I Loved: Honored Guest

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picture-28One of my favorite books is the story-collection Honored Guest (2004) by Joy Williams. I like it to a degree that its “flaws” seem to function “completely” as contributors to its “tone,” which I like, and which therefore creates a situation for me where “there are no ‘flaws,’ only ‘idiosyncrasies’ that contribute to the ‘tone.’” This contrasts with books where I can easily sense what I like and dislike, for example I like the dialogue and social interactions in Less Than Zero (1985) and American Psycho (1991) by Bret Easton Ellis but dislike the violent parts.

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