Posts Tagged: JSTOR

This Week in Essays

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Oh, the simple pleasures of life before the Internet. Emma Rathbone hilariously takes us back to that arguably better time over for New Yorker. At JSTOR Daily, M. Milks comes to claim their queer identity thanks to the most radical of groups: book club. Gloria Harrison’s life splits in two after a terrible accident, and she attempts […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Larissa MacFarquhar

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Larissa MacFarquhar discusses her book Strangers Drowning, why she finds nonfiction so compelling, and how she gets inside the minds of her subjects.

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Tech, Humanity, Language, and Romance

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For JSTOR Daily, Matt Langione reviews the current state of artificial intelligence, and the strides AI technology must make to fully complement human thought and experience. The latest step, Langione notes, is the news that Google began improving its “natural language algorithms” with the text of romance novels, which opens the question of what kind […]

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Remaking Historical Memory

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For JSTOR Daily, Ellen C. Caldwell examines historical “memory-making” and our changing interpretations of historical events over time. Caldwell focuses on the 1746 Battle of Culloden, a battle that ended the Jacobite Uprising and decisively transformed the British monarchy and Scottish Highland culture. Further influencing the history around Culloden, the battle features as a pivotal historical […]

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Losing Language

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At JSTOR Daily, linguist Chi Luu looks at language loss in victims of trauma, specifically trauma in wartime. Luu’s case studies range from a monolingual teenaged prisoner isolated in Guantanamo Bay to POWs in Russia isolated from their native cultures and first languages for decades at a time.

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Mary Somerville: Journalist, Scientist

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Matthew Wills revisits the life and career of Mary Somerville, a 19th century scientist, translator, and a popular science journalist. Somerville also has a notable place in linguistic history: the word scientist was first used in a review of her book, On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences, in 1834.

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The Art of Inventing Language

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Chi Luu writes for JSTOR Daily on the popularity of invented languages, ranging from the mystical language created by a 12th century abbess to contemporary constructed languages such as Esperanto and Klingon. Invented languages found in literature are really examples of linguistic artistry, language for art’s sake, not necessarily for real world utility or universality…. […]

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Only the Lives Worth Saving

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For JSTOR Daily, Tara Isabella Burton revisits Prohibition during the Coolidge administration, when the moral outrage that pushed for Prohibition didn’t extend to saving the lives of people dying from poisoned industrial alcohol: …[the] New York of the 1920’s viewed certain populations as disposable. By entering the sphere of immorality, alcoholics, in the eyes of […]

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The Downfall of the Pun

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Punning surprises us by flouting the law of nature which pretends that two things cannot occupy the same space at the same time. Where does the pun come from? And why does it prompt ubiquitous eye-rolls? Dive into the history of the “comical frolic” over at JSTOR.

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The Start of Visual Literacy

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For JSTOR Daily, Allana Mayer writes about what it means to master visual literacy. Mayer specifically addresses the idea that libraries and galleries digitizing their content will instantly make people more literate with visual art. Instead, competency with visual art should be measured by the ability to contextualize and analyze work made available in these […]

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The (Im)Purity of Language

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At JSTOR Daily, linguist Chi Luu makes a case for emphasizing grammar rules that follow popular usage, rather than the pedantic standards set by centuries-dead classicists. Here are the plain facts: many of these pop grammar rules… were magically pulled out of thin air by a handful of 18th and 19th century prescriptive grammarians…. Often […]

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Origins of the Book Club

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At JSTOR Daily, Pamela Burger follows the history of women’s book clubs from their progressive 19th century origins to their recent Oprah-inspired revival: In many ways, these older groups paved the way for women to view themselves as having a rightful place in intellectual culture. The seriousness of their work gave credence to women’s participation […]

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The Last of Their Words

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Chi Luu writes for JSTOR Daily on the rapid extinction of the world’s languages and linguists’ efforts to preserve these dying languages for future generations. On the surface, there isn’t anything wrong with people wanting to communicate with each other in a language they all understand. A global language certainly has its advantages…. In the […]

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A College Education, Measured and Graded and Ranked and Weighed

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The [Department of Education’s] report states: “In today’s world, college is not a luxury that only some Americans can afford to enjoy; it is an economic, civic, and personal necessity for all Americans.” Most defenders of the liberal arts would agree with that statement. And yet the report does not elaborate why college is a […]

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A Success for Public Access to Information!

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Remember when Aaron Swartz challenged the US Government by illegally downloading over 4 million articles from JSTOR, in hopes of breaking down the barriers that prevent public access to information? He was facing some major charges including a million dollar fine and major prison time, but JSTOR just announced the optimistic news that “all its […]

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Open Knowledge vs. US Government

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Aaron Swartz, former Demand Progress Executive Director, political activist and Cambridge Web Entrepreneur, was arrested for illegally downloading over 4 million articles from the nonprofit subscription-based internet archive, JSTOR. Swartz’s activism is directed towards the “free flow of information,” and “commitment to open knowledge.” The charges against him include “wire fraud, computer fraud, unlawfully obtaining […]

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