Posts Tagged: Korea

This Week in Trumplandia

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Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your community, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of the truth.

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Wanted/Needed/Loved: Weyes Blood’s Mysterious Kris

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To this day no one really knows where my kris came from or whether or not it’s a significant part of my family history, if it’s a random object or an heirloom with an untold story. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Revolution Books in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood is exploiting Trump’s election to raise money for a fight against fascism.

People in Japan value neighborhood bookstores so much that local governments are opening government-run stores in an effort to keep community spaces flourishing.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Chicago’s bookstores, bracing against the looming arrival of a physical Amazon store, are stronger than ever. Check out this roundup of local indie stores.

Fišer bookstore, a Prague institution since the 1930s, is closing.

Korea’s oldest bookstore closed fourteen years ago, but Jongno Books is set to reopen in Seoul.

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The Read Along: Christina Nichol

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Christina Nichol, author of Waiting for the Electricity, takes a deep dive into Korean literature and catches up on some classics of anthropology and psychology. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 7): “Facing It”

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There should be no forgetting, much less forgiveness, of what happened during the Vietnam War. ...more

The America We Live in Now

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I don’t consider myself a political person. To me, there are no “wrong” political beliefs. I believe that democracy means respecting everyone’s right to her opinion. And if I were forced to declare my own political views, I would have to reluctantly admit that, out of cynicism and self-interest, I find myself increasingly leaning towards the right.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Chicago bookstores are worried about the arrival of a physical Amazon store.

One bookstore is using clickbait tactics on social media to trick people into reading more books.

Some people actually like airport bookstores.

A rural Virginia bookstore has become wildly successful.

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Writing to Legitimize the Self

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To research her book Without You, There Is No Us, Suki Kim worked undercover as an ESL teacher in North Korea. Kim was reluctant to call the work a memoir, believing that to do so “trivialized” her investigative reporting. The result was a backlash from critics, who called her undercover methods “dishonest.” At The New Republic, Kim responds to her critics:

Here I am telling my story to you, the reader, essentially to beg for acknowledgment: I am an investigative journalist, please take me seriously. 

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The Rumpus Interview with Minsoo Kang

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Writer and historian Minsoo Kang talks about his new translation of The Story of Hong Gildong, a touchstone novel of Korea written in the 19th century. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Corinne Goria

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Author and veteran Voice of Witness editor Peter Orner sits down with Invisible Hands: Voices From the Global Economy editor Corinne Goria to talk about putting the book together, economic interdependency, and the complex human stories behind everyday items. ...more

Forgotten Country, by Catherine Chung

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In Catherine Chung’s Forgotten Country, Janie, the eldest daughter of a Korean immigrant family and a graduate student in mathematics, has always carried the responsibility of appeasing and protecting her little sister Hannah, and has always felt she had to be “the one who had to fill the missing pieces.” On the very day of her sister’s birth, their grandmother tells young Janie that every generation of their family has lost a daughter and that it is her responsibility to keep her little sister safe.

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