Posts Tagged: Larry Levis

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 14): “Some Grass Along a Ditch Bank”

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...being on the edge of the natural world is like being on the edge of time. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Chris Santiago

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Chris Santigo on his new collection Tula, writing a multilingual text, and the connections between music and writing poetry. ...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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To kick things off, Brandon Hicks offers us the hilarious illustrated life story of a “Born Failure.”

Then, National Poetry Month continues at The Rumpus. First, Amanda Deutch’s “Island Factory” uses couplets to tell a tragic story of immigrant labor in Long Island City.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Phillip B. Williams

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Phillip B. Williams about his new book Thief in the Interior, form in poetry, and balancing editing work with one's own. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Ada Limón

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Ada Limón about her new book Bright Dead Things, writing love poems in an age of cynicism, and committing to places. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Cornerstones of American Poetry

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The only way I can put it is, no American poet I have ever met regardless of disposition or poetics has disliked Frank Stanford’s poems. ...more

The Last Poem I Loved: “Sleeping Lioness” by Larry Levis

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As a fiction writer, and as a reader, I gravitate toward stories from the perspective of a specific, imperfect and alert, outward-and-inward-looking consciousness, a transparent eyeball with legs and, at least occasionally, uncomfortable shoes. The danger of a story centered around the drama of attention and understanding—of a character trying to see and not only act but also understand the world—is the ever present pull toward (even temptation of) a resolving moment of insight, an epiphany, that may not be necessary, earned, correctly scaled.

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