Posts Tagged: Lynda Barry

People and Poetry: A Conversation with Kim Fu

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Poet and novelist Kim Fu discusses her new novel, The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore, how poetry impacts her fiction, and the expectations that accompany a book about lost children.

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Call and Response: A Conversation with Hannah Tinti

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Hannah Tinti discusses how The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley came into being, the formation of its characters, and how twelve scars and the celestial heavens help give this book structure and heft.

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Notable San Francisco: 10/4–10/10

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Literary events and readings in and around the Bay Area this week!

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Yona Harvey

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Yona Harvey talks about her path to becoming a poet, Winnie Mandela as an artistic inspiration, and what it means to write more publicly.

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Contentious Comic BFFs

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You may have missed Matt Groening and Lynda Barry in Sydney this past weekend, but never fear: over at the Guardian, you can still read about their lifelong friendship, which persists despite diverging paths. Groening is best known for The Simpsons, Barry for Ernie Pook’s Comeek; it all began at Evergreen College, where Matt Groening edited […]

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Spotlight: A Poetry Comics Discussion

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Amy Fusselman gathers four writer-artists working in the poetry comics genre to discuss the emerging form.

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The Course Syllabi of Famous Writers

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Imagine if the authors who created these syllabi for their courses were all teaching at the same school at the same time. “Who’d you get for English?” “David Foster Wallace. I hear he’s a hard grader. How about you?” “Donald Barthelme. He’s apparently making us read infinity books this semester.” P.S. If you’re as charmed by […]

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Creativity Tapping With Lynda Barry

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Veteran cartoonist Lynda Barry is highlighted in this New York Times piece, which explores her current roles, specifically that of a “creativity guru,” teaching creative writing classes for nonwriters. “Narrative, Barry believes, is so hard-wired into human beings that creativity can come as naturally to adults as it does to children. They need only to […]

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