Posts Tagged: Maggie Nelson

What to Read When You Want to Write Like a Mother

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A list of books that wrangle, directly or indirectly, with motherhood and all that comes with it (or its absence). ...more

There Is No Answer: Draw Your Weapons by Sarah Sentilles

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As Sentilles makes clear, she is against the wars the United States is currently involved in, and war in general, but she’s critical of what that means. ...more

What We’re Reading in July!

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We’re super excited to share that our July Book Club selection is New People by Danzy Senna! From the bestselling author of Caucasia, New People is a subversive and engrossing novel about race, class, and manners in contemporary America. Heartbreaking and darkly comic, New People is a bold and unfettered page-turner that challenges our every assumption about how we define one another, and ourselves.

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Notable Los Angeles: 6/5–6/11

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Monday 6/5: Keith Kurlander discusses and signs Look Like This at 56. 7 p.m. at Book Soup.

Lauren Eggert-Crowe celebrates the release of her new chapbook, Bitches of the Drought. 8 p.m. at Stories Books and Cafe.

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Haunted by Child Refugees: Valeria Luiselli’s Tell Me How It Ends

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These aren’t ghosts; these are children who have braved a perilous journey to escape the violent nightmares back home. ...more

Notable Philadelphia: 4/25–5/1

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Tuesday 4/25: April Sours Bring May Flowers. Sour beer tasting. 7 p.m. at Jose Pistola’s.

Yoga in the Park. 12 p.m. at Dilworth Park.

Wednesday 4/26: Maggie Nelson reads for the Bryn Mawr Reading Series. 7:30 p.m.

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What to Read When Things Go Nuclear

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Here are some books to read that will remind you that there is beauty out there, even if it's hard-wrought. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Melissa Febos

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Melissa Febos discusses her new book Abandon Me, choosing to be celibate for six months, letting go of our own mythologies, and the sexist reaction women receive when they write nonfiction. ...more

What to Read When the President Cuts Funding for Everything Good

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A list of books written by past NEA grant recipients, as well as books that inspire protest and remind us that we can make a different reality than the one we're in today. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Melissa Febos

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Melissa Febos discusses Abandon Me, confessional writing, Billie Holiday, reenacting trauma, cataloguing narratives, and searching for identity. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Eileen Myles

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Eileen Myles on recording her new poetry record Aloha/irish trees, the relationship between poetry and comedy, and finding safety in social media. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Emily Raboteau

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Emily Raboteau discusses her essay, “Know Your Rights!” from the collection, The Fire This Time, what she loves about motherhood, and why it’s time for White America to get uncomfortable. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Belle Boggs

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Belle Boggs discusses The Art of Waiting about navigating through the difficulties of conception and fertility treatment. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Jericho Parms

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What is lost still has substance, is malleable, can take on new impressions, and be molded again to our experience, often resulting in the most lasting force that determines how we see the world. ...more

Maggie Nelson’s Natural

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Reading Maggie Nelson can be like banging your head against the wall of categories—or being miraculously freed from them. At Fiction Advocate, Colter Ruland elicits an explanation of hybridity from Nelson:

I just do what’s natural, I’m not thinking, “this is high,” “this is low,” “let’s combine them.” Often I don’t know that something wasn’t “supposed” to be in conversation with something else until someone else reads it that way and tells me so; to me it’s just one flow.

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The Rumpus Interview with Brian Blanchfield

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Poet and writer Brian Blanchfield talks about his essay collection Proxies, touring in support of a prose collection versus a poetry collection, and frottage. ...more

The Self as a Cultural Artifact

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[Memoir] comes alive at the fissures of its coherency: when a narrator is struggling to hold the self together in a text—for the reader’s sake if not also her own.

Scott F. Parker met up with Maggie Nelson at AWP to talk about her writing, her sudden popularity, memoir (or life writing), autotheory, and Buddhism for The Believer’s interview series, Stories of Self—complete with illustrations by Nelson’s partner, Harry Dodge.

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Jen Fitzgerald’s Poetry Mixtape #3: Poetry That Asks You to Sit and Sort This Whole Thing Out

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I’m spending National Poetry Month at the Millay Colony, former home of Edna St. Vincent Millay. My colleague and friend, poet and writer Jen Fitzgerald, will be writing the Mixtape column this month—and we are all lucky for it. Enjoy Jen’s robust selections and I’ll see you in May.

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Ablaze with Care

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As we said our vows, we were undone. We wept, besotted with our luck.

Maggie Nelson, interviewed by Paul Laity for the Guardian, talks about her life before and during her deservedly acclaimed autobiotheoreticalnovel The Argonauts, from following Eileen Myles to New York after graduate school to the investigation of her aunt’s brutal murder, and the love she’s found and made continually new.

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(K)ink: Writing While Deviant: Tina Horn

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I would go so far as to say that the entire reason I write is to detect all the irony that language allows and twist it around the truth like razor wire and ivy. That’s how I like my truth: twisted. ...more

Perfunctory Rebellion

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Over at BOMB, A.L. Stein sits down with Maggie Nelson, author of The Argonauts, to chat about metaphysics, attachments, and her relationship with the normative:

“The normative/transgressive dichotomy is so deep. I remember a student I had a while ago, a trans person deeply invested in anti-assimilation, who was saying to me quite plaintively one day, “I just don’t see how to keep resisting the normative!” So I asked him, “Can you name what it is, exactly, that you feel like you have to resist?” And he said, “Well, I don’t want to get married or have a baby.” After he left my office I just kept thinking, Well, that’s weird, ‘cuz I’m married, and I have a baby.”

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