Posts Tagged: marriage

A Way to Make Sense of the World with Suzanne Buffam

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Poet Suzanne Buffam discusses her latest work, A Pillow Book, sleep remedies that don’t work, and the worries that occupy her mind and keep her from sleep. ...more

Learning to Live Alone through the Legacy of Mary Tyler Moore

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Characters like Mary and Rhoda hadn't been turned into stereotypes of single women in their thirties or career women or divorcees. They couldn't be: they were the first. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Summer of Families

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“What do you think about this,” he said, measured and cool. “What if we offer a service where people can pay to be in our family, but only for a few hours.” ...more

The Rumpus Interview With Danielle Trussoni

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Danielle Trussoni discusses her new memoir, The Fortress, black magic, the cult of marriage, and the dark side of storytelling. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jade Sharma

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Jade Sharma discusses her first novel Problems, the complicated feelings that came with debuting to rave reviews, and her writing and editing processes. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, a new Maggie Shipstead story at Virginia Quarterly Review explores love, infidelity, and the ways life can slip from under your feet like an avalanche. Bonus: there is also a literal avalanche. The story, “Backcountry,” follows a twenty-five-year-old ski instructor named Ingrid (#1 baby name for future ski instructors) who meets a fifty-plus-year-old married (he tells Ingrid he’s divorced) man with big dreams of building a ski resort on a nearby mountain.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

Letter to Jim

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Many days I couldn’t see the way forward, but I kept going, the way you had. It was you, after all, who taught me how to stay. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Such a Thing

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The future perfect tense indicates an action that is certain to occur. But when the future is not perfect or certain, the conditional “would” is more appropriate. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Imbolo Mbue

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Imbolo Mbue discusses her debut novel Behold the Dreamers, teaching herself how to write a novel, and the price of the American Dream. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #60: Leah Kaminsky

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Leah Kaminsky’s debut novel, The Waiting Room, depicts one fateful day in the life of an Australian doctor and mother, Dina, living in Haifa, Israel. Dina is trying to maintain normalcy as she goes about her work as a family doctor, cares for her son, and fights to preserve her faltering relationship with her husband, with whom she’s expecting a daughter.

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The Rumpus Interview with Gonzalo Torné

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Acclaimed Spanish novelist Gonzalo Torné discusses his first novel to be translated into English, Divorce Is in the Air, his ideal reader, and the economic crisis in Spain. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with J.D. Vance

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J.D. Vance talks about his memoir, Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, the perils of upward mobility, and never forgetting where you come from. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Janice N. Harrington

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Janice N. Harrington on her new collection Primitive and critiquing the use of "primitive" to describe African American folk art. ...more

A Man’s ABCs of Miscarriage

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I once heard the only thing faster than the speed of light is the speed of thought, and I wonder if simply thinking about Sawyer’s sister until my head hurts could get us to the place we fear talking about. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Anuk Arudpragasam

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Anuk Arudpragasm discusses his debut novel The Story of a Brief Marriage, the bombing of civilians during the war in Sri Lanka, documenting war crimes, and powerful Tamil women. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: The Year of Light and Dark

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It isn’t much of a contest to say that Julie Coyne is the single most inspirational human being I have ever met. And I am here—in Xela—in part because I could use a little inspiration. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Anne Raeff

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Married authors Anne Raeff and Lori Ostlund, both winners of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, discuss their craft, their process, and the way they negotiate the give and take involved in sharing a vocation. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Paula Whyman

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Paula Whyman discusses her debut collection You May See a Stranger, discovering truth in fiction, and how memory interferes with good storytelling. ...more