Posts Tagged: marriage

This Week of Short Fiction

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New motherhood: it’s common but totally strange, completely natural yet weirdly alien, a beautiful miracle and absolutely disgusting. It can also have some strong effects on a woman’s perception of self and identity, as Helen Phillips (The Beautiful Bureaucrat) explores brilliantly in her story “The Doppelgängers,” chosen by Lauren Groff at Recommended Reading this week.

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Voices of Addiction #1: Baby’s Home

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I got to thinking about home. What the fuck is home anyway? ...more

More Money, (Not) More Problems

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In a powerful and anecdotal essay at The Toast, Nicole Chung discusses how money-related anxiety has stayed with her into adulthood, and how disparity between her and her husband’s attitudes toward money influences the dynamic of their marriage:

It makes it sound as though my money-related anxiety is nothing more than an unfortunate personality quirk, when in fact there’s an excellent reason why my husband generally believes things will work out, while I tend to imagine we are just one crisis away from financial ruin: he comes from a family for whom things do work out, and I do not.

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The Rumpus Interview with Charles Bock

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Charles Bock discusses his new novel, Alice & Oliver, the challenges of writing from experience, and how art and life can mirror one another. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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If you’re not yet aware of the online magazine Storychord, take this chance to get acquainted. Each issue features a short story, a piece of visual art, and a musical composition, which combine to make a sort of multimedia storytelling triptych and a unique reading experience.

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Ablaze with Care

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As we said our vows, we were undone. We wept, besotted with our luck.

Maggie Nelson, interviewed by Paul Laity for the Guardian, talks about her life before and during her deservedly acclaimed autobiotheoreticalnovel The Argonauts, from following Eileen Myles to New York after graduate school to the investigation of her aunt’s brutal murder, and the love she’s found and made continually new.

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(K)ink #7: Writing While Deviant: Brian Kornell

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The more secrets I wrote about, the fewer I wanted to keep. And the more secrets I made public through my writing, the more I gained. ...more

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Visible: Women Writers of Color #1: Desiree Cooper

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Desiree Cooper discusses her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, what mother-writers need, and why motherhood is the only story she’s ever told. ...more

Frigid feature

Frigid

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My first gynecologist tells me that my vagina is on the smaller side of the normal range. I use this as a justification for why, at eighteen, I still can’t get a tampon in more than a quarter of an inch past my hymen. ...more

Own Vanishing feature

Are We All Our Own Vanishing

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We will never be an exclamation point, an ellipses, a question mark. We must all leave with this: a period—solid, and utterly irrefutable. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Review: Carol

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Carol is a powerful woman with enviable self-knowledge, effortlessly creating an erotic, sensual ideal of herself as a covert spectacle for queer midcentury women. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Sandra and Ben Doller

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Sandra and Ben Doller talk about The Yesterday Project, a blind collaboration, and about what it means to savor each day when you have stage III melanoma. ...more

Defining America through Marriage

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At Marginalia, a channel of the Los Angeles Review of Books, Darryl W. Stephens reviews a new history of 19th century marriage by Leslie Harris. Harris’s book documents the ways public rhetoric and legal proceedings reshaped marriage into a new institution to define early American culture:

[Harris] has offered concrete illustrations of how rhetoric about marriage bolsters an American mythology in which civilization triumphs over barbarians and moral virtue wins over unrestrained sin.
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The Last Book I Loved: Sheila Levine Is Dead and Living In New York

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But when my loneliness feels as vast—and capable of drowning me—as the sea, this book about self-destruction comforts me more than any self-help. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Kate Bolick

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Kate Bolick talks about her new book, Spinster: Making a Life of One’s Own, writing and the nuclear family, and whether women are finally people yet. ...more