Posts Tagged: masculinity

The Rumpus Interview with Roxane Gay

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Roxane Gay discusses her new collection, Difficult Women, the problem with whiteness as the default and the need for diverse representation, and life as a workaholic. ...more

Macho Prey: Homophobia and Unlikely Victims in Tickled

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The film only grazes the issue, but homophobia is the fuel of the harassment that the targets face. ...more

What I’ll Tell My Children: On Being ‘F***Able’ under the Regime of President-elect

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It’s time to take responsibility for compliancy. ...more

Fitting Characters and Scripts

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Unwittingly, my mother teaches me in this conversation her generation’s word for gay: 同性恋. I look it up in an online dictionary, three characters in my mother’s tongue. Same, sex, and love. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Brit Bennett

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Brit Bennett discusses her debut novel The Mothers, investigating “what-if” moments, and navigating racism in white spaces. ...more

Kahlo vs. Kardashian: The Subversive Potential of the Female Self-Portrait

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Where does the line between the self-portrait and the selfie fall? ...more

Passing in Football

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The fear of expulsion from that collective black-boy body, of being deemed not black enough or male enough or straight enough, counterfeit somehow, terrified me.

As football comes under increasing scrutiny from all sides, Frederick McKindra, over at BuzzFeed, pens a lyrical ode to the naive dance of masculinity he witnessed on his childhood football teams—and the particular intricacy of this dance for the black boys who found the sport to be one of the only places they can carve out space for themselves.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with David Rivard

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David Rivard discusses his new collection Standoff, writing as both a public and private act, the interiority of reading, and Pokémon GO. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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Rion Amilcar Scott’s debut collection Insurrections—our July Rumpus Book Club pick—comes out from University Press of Kentucky on Tuesday and is a timely and vital look into the daily struggles of individuals in the mostly black community of Cross River, Maryland, a fictional town that was founded by slaves in 1807 after a successful revolt.

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Winning the Game of Thrones Like a Girl

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The days of testosterone-fueled warmongering are long past. Instead, at the end of Season 6, the queens reign, stronger than ever. ...more

Let the Men Have Their Book Clubs

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Taking a different stance on the men-only book clubs that have everyone rolling their eyes, Slate’s L.V. Anderson argues that feminists should applaud men embracing an activity that has been so coded as feminine—and eagerly await the day when men do not feel like they have to declare their masculinity in order to do so:

Men who deliberately take time to discuss literature with other men are subverting and challenging gender norms, no matter how jokily macho their book club names might be.

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Regarding the Boy

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What happens to a place when it can no longer define itself by its history, when it tears everything down? What is the rust belt without the plants, the factories? Who is the boy without his sister? ...more

Laboring for Masculinity

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Allison J. Pugh writes for Aeon on the role of labor in defining American masculinity. After interviewing nearly a hundred subjects, Pugh looks at how work defines the self-worth of men, and how un/underemployed men try to redefine masculinity in light of this:

What does it mean to prize something—to understand it as a primary measure of what it means to live a life of value—when it is becoming scarcer?

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The Rumpus Interview with Benjamin Percy

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Benjamin Percy discusses his latest novel, The Dead Lands, why it’s all about keeping language fresh, and his dream job writing for DC Comics. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Informing Form

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She was a physical, as opposed to a media, reality to me—someone with a voice to be addressed rather than a flattened image. ...more

Macho Literary Culture

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Kingsley Amis all but disappeared from the American literary consciousness after his death. Many of his novels were not even available stateside after their initial publication, although a new line of reprints is changing that. However, The New Republic asks whether American readers can handle Amis, a masculine, writer-as-worker persona:

With his talk of product and workbenches, Amis is trying to create the image of the writer as an ordinary worker, to dispel art’s associations with foppishness and pretentiousness and self-aggrandizement.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Kill Bob

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Kill Bill is revolutionary because it disrupts both content and genre, beautifully showcasing what these superhero-action stories so consistently overlook, while embodying the success of what the genre could achieve. ...more