Posts Tagged: Megan Mayhew Bergman

People and Poetry: A Conversation with Kim Fu

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Poet and novelist Kim Fu discusses her new novel, The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore, how poetry impacts her fiction, and the expectations that accompany a book about lost children.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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When literary magazines publish “Women’s Issues,” they can run the danger of making women into a theme. As if fiction by and about women is a curiosity, something to enjoy for a moment, in one issue a year, before returning to your regularly scheduled old white men programming. The title itself can imply that the […]

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Hunting the Pages

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I find the threat of predation satisfying in a short story because, when done well, it solicits a visceral reaction. The etymology of the word visceral can be traced to the Latin word viscera, which was used to refer to internal organs; the plural term, viscus, refers to “flesh.” A visceral reaction refers to an […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Robert Stone’s fictional universe was vast. The minds of Vietnam vets. Sailors on the open sea. Hidden romances at a prestigious university. But last weekend, one of our better explorers of the darker corners of American life was lost when Stone died at the age of 77 from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A writer of […]

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Notable NYC: 1/3–1/9

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Monday 1/5: Jason Sokol and Brent Staples talk about All Eyes Are Upon Us: Race and Politics from Boston to Brooklyn. Greenlight Bookstore, 7:30 p.m., free. Tuesday 1/6: Nellie Hermann discusses her novel The Season of Migration with Chris Adrian. BookCourt, 7 p.m., free. Wednesday 1/7: Megan Mayhew Bergman reads from her story collection Almost […]

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The Wide Open (And Increasingly Traveled) Road

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For The Kenyon Review “Credo” series, Megan Mayhew Bergman offers some thoughts on “socially-conscious writing”: I’m not sure if it was becoming a mother, or publishing my first book—because these events happened in essentially the same year—but when it comes to my writing career, all I can tell myself is: make it matter. Make it count.

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The Last Book I Loved: West with the Night

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Her mother was a nurse, shot in World War II in Nepal. She—my mother-in-law—was an Ivy League-educated, motorcycle-driving, garden-planting veterinarian in Vermont… with a pilot’s license. When she passed away after a bout with cancer, two weeks after the birth of my first child, I decided to read her favorite book, Beryl Markham’s West with […]

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