Posts Tagged: misogyny

Transgressive and Unruly Women: Talking with Anne Helen Petersen

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Anne Helen Peterson discusses her new book, Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud: The Rise and Reign of the Unruly Woman, her writing process, and academia. ...more

Love Thy Neighbor: Talking with Yewande Omotoso

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Writer, poet, and architect Yewande Omotoso discusses her second novel, The Woman Next Door, Cape Town’s haunting beauty, and mythologies about motherhood. ...more

“Everywhere They Hurt Little Girls”: Female Revenge in Game of Thrones

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In Westeros, revenge mostly operates within the feminine realm... ...more

Your Patriotism Isn’t Love, It’s Blindness

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Love of country, some argue. With their boots firmly planted in my chest as I struggle to protest. No, that is not love, but blindness. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #93: Barbara Browning

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When I requested an interview from Barbara Browning to talk about her new novel, The Gift, she agreed and asked if I had a favorite song she could cover for me on the ukulele. Browning possesses many gifts—she is an accomplished dancer, novelist, performance artist, theorist, teacher, and self-described amateur musician—and The Gift is a rumination on the relationship between artistic giftedness and gift economies, an idea Browning borrowed from Lewis Hyde’s text by the same name.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Erika L. Sánchez

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Erika L. Sánchez discusses her new collection Lessons on Expulsion, pushing back against sexism and misogyny, being a troublemaker, and donkeys. ...more

Home Is Here

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There is no singular Muslim story, no definitive identity for the entire religion. [...] Here, four women discuss what it's like to be a minority in America in 2017, post-9/11 and post-Trump. ...more

Reclaiming the Language of Pop Culture: Reversible by Marisa Crawford

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Marisa Crawford’s Reversible is an evocative collection, showcasing the ways in which pop culture saturates us with meaning, and how it teaches us to become. ...more

Every Woman Is a Nation unto Herself: A Conversation with Sabina Murray

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Sabina Murray discusses the novel Valiant Gentleman, writing characters that are fundamentally different from herself, and confronting issues of colonization. ...more

Susan Sarandon, “Bernie Bro” Politics, and White Privilege

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As a longtime fan, it pains me to say it, but Sarandon is everything that's wrong with mainstream, non-intersectional white feminism. ...more

Interrogating the English Language with Safiya Sinclair

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To be forced to speak in the language of the colonist, the language of the oppressor, while also carrying within us the storm of Jamaican patois, we live under a constant hurricane of our doubleness. ...more

The Friends of Dorothy Have Something to Say to Kansas

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As we move backward in time, we must beware of yellow brick fallacies. Also: poppy fields, flying monkeys, and entrepreneurial wizards. ...more

What I’ll Tell My Children: On Being ‘F***Able’ under the Regime of President-elect

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It’s time to take responsibility for compliancy. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Walk On

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As writers, we must write it out. Tear off the veils and air the rotting fruits. ...more

Wolves

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The men who called me names were always white men, dressed in the shirts and ties that marked them as belonging to a different class than I did. They sat down next to me when I asked them not to, they kept touching me when I asked them to stop.

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The Editing of Anne Frank’s Diary Was Sexist

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There’s something very unsettling about the idea of editing someone’s personal and autobiographical journal. After all, it’s supposed to be a portal into the past: Anne’s experience in the annex, exactly what happened exactly as it happened.

At The Establishment, Stephanie Watson makes the case for buying only the unabridged version of Anne Frank’s Diary—the version we’re all familiar with was sanitized of all passages about her sexuality and other gender-specific topics.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, we all need a story with heart and teeth, a story that celebrates the glittering intelligence of women and the power of female friendship and dismantles the patriarchy while also being laugh-out-loud funny, a story with a happy ending.

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The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Tiny Bubbles

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A bubble is a sphere of privilege, but it also provides the safety to mix up more soapy water and to blow new bubbles to protect what we hold dear. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Cole Lavalais

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Cole Lavalais discusses her debut novel, Summer of the Cicadas, why she’s a huge fan of outlining, and the importance of dedicated communities for black writers. ...more

Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #20: Greats

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Great strides, great artists, great desires, great complexity—this week’s books are all about these kinds of greats. They also all showcase exceptional writing and take us far and wide—from elective politics to abstract art, from Coney Island to California—to explore great ideas.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Vanessa Blakeslee

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I don’t want to waste readers’ time with a several hundred-page novel that’s not relevant to the wicked problems we’re facing today. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, let’s talk about dialogue. As with any facet of writing, there are “rules.” Don’t be too formal—real people don’t talk like the dictionary. Don’t be so informal—all that slang is distracting. Use dialogue tags sparingly. Use more dialogue tags to clarify who is speaking.

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The Rumpus Interview with Maggie Nelson

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Author Maggie Nelson talks about matrophobia, “sodomitical maternity,” breaking down categories between genres of writing, and her new book, The Argonauts. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Monica Byrne

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Monica Byrne talks about sex, gender, the insidious power of stereotypes, and putting relationships between women at the center of her novel, The Girl in the Road. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Elisa Albert

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Elisa Albert discusses her new novel, After Birth, postpartum depression, childbearing, and the misogyny of modern medicine in pathologizing the normal processes of birth and the female body. ...more

The Rise and Fall of Alt Lit

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The Alt Lit community brought together a disparate group of writers and poets from the sorts of backgrounds often ignored by mainstream literary fiction, leveraging the Internet and building a loyal and dedicated following. Then this fall, allegations of a history of rape, sexual abuse, and misogyny within the community exploded across the Internet.

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Literary Geniuses Say Some Not-So-Genius Things

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In “honor” of David Gilmour’s comments to a Hazlitt interviewer about how he refused to teach books by female authors, Rumpus contributor Michelle Dean rounded up some other literary men’s contributions to the field of misogyny.

From Hemingway blaming all men’s problems on women’s diseased brains to T.

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