Posts Tagged: nonfiction

Truth and Beauty: Talking with Joshua Wolf Shenk

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The new Editor-in-Chief of The Believer dismantles stereotypes of Las Vegas, discusses the magazine's acquisition, and makes a case for bringing journalism into the academy. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #90: Erika Carter

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Erika Carter’s debut novel Lucky You tells the story of three young women in their early twenties who leave their waitressing jobs in an Arkansas college town to embark on a year off grid in the Ozark Mountains. In a remote house, without a washing machine or cell phone reception, Ellie, Chloe, and Rachel grapple with questions of identity, purpose, and what it means to be human.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Amy Benson

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Our American obsession with the personal and individual has made us the tremendous resource consumers we are in the world. ...more

Down the Rabbit Hole of Experimental Fiction: Michael J. Seidlinger on Becoming a Reader

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Michael J. Seidlinger discusses returning to House of Leaves for Ig Publishing’s "Bookmarked" series. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Melissa Febos

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Melissa Febos discusses her new book Abandon Me, choosing to be celibate for six months, letting go of our own mythologies, and the sexist reaction women receive when they write nonfiction. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Abeer Hoque

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Abeer Hoque talks about coming of age in the predominantly white suburbs of Pittsburgh, rewriting her memoir manuscript ten times, and looking for poetry in prose. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with George Saunders

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George Saunders discusses his new (and first) novel Lincoln in the Bardo, Donald Trump, and a comprehensive theory of literature. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Ben Tanzer

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Ben Tanzer discusses his new essay collection Be Cool, why running is so important to him, and not being precious about his work. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jon Day

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Jon Day discusses his memoir, Cyclogeography: Journeys of a London Bicycle Courier, the bicycle as a symbol of gentrification, and the city as "a technology for living." ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Larissa MacFarquhar

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Larissa MacFarquhar discusses her book Strangers Drowning, why she finds nonfiction so compelling, and how she gets inside the minds of her subjects. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jerald Walker

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Jerald Walker discusses his memoir, The World in Flames: A Black Boyhood in a White Supremacist Doomsday Cult, the story of his childhood in The Worldwide Church of God, and how the act of writing delivered him from bitterness. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Emily Raboteau

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Emily Raboteau discusses her essay, “Know Your Rights!” from the collection, The Fire This Time, what she loves about motherhood, and why it’s time for White America to get uncomfortable. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Kerry and Tyler Cohen

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Sisters and collaborators Kerry and Tyler Cohen talk about their new book Girl Trouble: An Illustrated Memoir, female friendships, and some of the challenges of writing memoir. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #63: Patrick Madden

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Patrick Madden teaches writing at Brigham Young University and is the author of the essay collection Quotidiana. His essays frequently appear in literary magazines and have been featured in The Best Creative Nonfiction and The Best American Spiritual Writing anthologies.

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The Rumpus Interview with Terry McDonell

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Terry McDonell talks about his new memoir The Accidental Life and his career in the magazine business, which spans the beginning of New Journalism through the digital revolution. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Belle Boggs

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Belle Boggs discusses The Art of Waiting about navigating through the difficulties of conception and fertility treatment. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jane Alison

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Jane Alison discusses her autobiographical novel, Nine Island, the value of truth in fiction, and unsubscribing from romantic love. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with J.D. Vance

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J.D. Vance talks about his memoir, Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, the perils of upward mobility, and never forgetting where you come from. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Fairy Tales, Trauma, Writing into Dissociation

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Our bodies are incredible and intelligent things. ...more

The Power of Unreality

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While fiction embraces the flights of fancy that come with imagination, nonfiction is fairly hostile to writers who stray too far away from the objective facts of the story. How closely should writers of nonfiction stick to facts? At Electric Literature, Justin Lawrence Daugherty makes the case for embracing some unreality in writing nonfiction:

We can talk about truth versus fact.

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A Romance with Concision

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Can’t wait for Sarah Manguso’s newest book, 300 Arguments? Over at Harper’s Magazine, you can read an essay excerpted from the book about brevity and aphorisms. Manguso writes:

Please don’t try to convince me that my romance with concision follows from the way we experience reality now, in interrupted and interruptive increments; or that if I like short literature I should be on Twitter; or that my taste is merely a symptom of a pathological inability to focus or commit; or that since I have a child I no longer have the time to write at length.

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The Rumpus Interview with Arielle Greenberg

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Arielle Greenberg talks about her new collection, Locally Made Panties, the possibility of feminist pornography, and curating her Rumpus column, (K)ink: Writing While Deviant. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Whitney Terrell

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Whitney Terrell discusses war, gender, and fiction vs. reality in his new novel, The Good Lieutenant, about a female soldier in Iraq. ...more

A Quiet Corner of the World

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At the New York Times, Adelle Waldman, author of The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P., writes about how a national park in Montana left an indelible mark on her and her marriage:

We were both intoxicated by the place, not only by its beauty but by the feeling of remoteness that is as much psychological as geographic.

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